This graph illustrates who has the most credibility with streetwear enthusiasts, with influences from social media that are low on the list

Streetwear, including top brands such as Supreme, Off-White and Nike, remains white among consumers, but a new survey suggests that the influence of social media stars diminishes when it is time for consumers to choose what they want to wear.

In North America, a majority (69 percent) of streetwear enthusiasts cite musicians – especially hip-hop and rap artists – as their most credible inspiration for streetwear, followed by contemporary artists (55 percent) and industry insiders (51 percent), according to the survey of 40,960 people by PricewaterhouseCoopers and HypeBeast.

Only 38 percent said social media influencers play a part in their spending decisions, while nearly 27 percent say they consider celebrities credible when it comes to streetwear.

This graph illustrates who has the most credibility with streetwear enthusiasts, with influences from social media that are low on the list

This graph illustrates who has the most credibility with streetwear enthusiasts, with influences from social media that are low on the list

This graph illustrates the main reasons why streetwear fans say they buy and wear the products

This graph illustrates the main reasons why streetwear fans say they buy and wear the products

This graph illustrates the main reasons why streetwear fans say they buy and wear the products

& # 39; Streetwear has managed to create the desirability of the product, something most of the fashion industry is struggling with, & # 39 ;, said Axel Nitschke of PWC, who wrote the report together, in an interview with The New York Times. & # 39; Those brands, sneaker brands, have enormous credibility within the peer group and that comes from the community. & # 39;

Streetwear has evolved since 2010, when brands worn by rappers, skateboarders and graffiti artists became more common and popular, Angelo Baque, former Supreme brand director, told The New York Times.

& # 39; Before that it was (city) clothing, which was a nice way to say that these were clothes that blacks and Puerto Ricans wear, & # 39; he told The Times.

On the west coast, streetwear began to master Skateboarders and surfers in the early & 90s – loose, comfortable clothing from brands such as Stüssy and Freshjive.

On the east coast, labels such as Triple Five Soul and Supreme came to embody what is now a thriving international business.

& # 39; Pioneers of the movement are James Jebbia, founder of skate brand Supreme, and Shawn Stussy, founder of surf brand Stüssy. Designer Dapper Dan played a crucial role in lifting streetwear to luxury as early as the 1980s from Harlem, New York, and created styles for hip hop artists who were shunned by traditional luxury brands & # 39 ;, the report said.

This graph illustrates the brands that streetwear enthusiasts claim to represent the pinnacle of style

This graph illustrates the brands that streetwear enthusiasts claim to represent the pinnacle of style

This graph illustrates the brands that streetwear enthusiasts claim to represent the pinnacle of style

& # 39; In the early 1990s & # 39; 90 we were all rooted in a kind of subculture & # 39 ;, Erik Brunetti, the designer behind the FUCT label, told The Times. & # 39; For example, skateboarding or graffiti or punk rock. Unlike brands of today, they are not really rooted in a kind of subculture. They just emerged from nowhere. & # 39;

Half of consumers said they were willing to stand in line for a product release, citing coolness, comfort, exclusivity and status as the main reasons for their dedication to streetwear.

Two-thirds of consumers said streetwear products never go out of fashion, and the same proportion said they attach great importance to brand activism when making a decision about what to buy.

A full half of consumers said they would probably stop buying a brand if a brand representative behaved inappropriately.

Supreme was the most cited brand (78 percent) when respondents were asked which lines illustrate streetwear most, followed by Nike (69 percent), Off-White (65 percent), Adidas (45 percent) and BAPE (37 percent).

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news