58% of Americans say that religion has become less important in the United States in the last 20 years

Dwindling faith: 58% of Americans say that religion has become less important in the US over the past 20 years.

  • More than half (57%) of Americans said it was bad that the US had become less religious, while 31% said it was a good development, according to the Pew Research Center international survey
  • On a personal level, 47% of Americans said that religion & # 39; very important & # 39; was in their lives, 26% said it was a little important, while another 26% said that religion was not too important or not important at all
  • Experts say that the decline of religion in the US is due to various factors, including one step away from small towns where the influence of a church can dominate a community and create social pressure to be present every week
  • Moreover, because society has become more liberal about social and sexual lifestyles, Millennials are less bound to organized religions that condemn sexual choices that they do not see as & # 39; bad & # 39; or immoral

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A majority (58 percent) of Americans believe that religion plays a less important role in the US than 20 years ago – and according to a majority of respondents that is bad news, a new study said.

Only 19 percent said that religion plays a more important role in America than twenty years ago, while 21 percent said there was no change, according to the Pew Research Center survey, which looked at how prominent religion is in 27 countries.

& # 39; In earlier generations of America, which were a more small town, a rural farmer, the chances were much greater that a religious organization would have control over its municipality & # 39 ;, said Robert Fuller, a professor of religious studies at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois.

This graph illustrates the change in attitudes over time about how important religion is to them personally. A growing proportion of Americans say it is not important, while the proportion that says it is very important have fallen by 12 percentage points since 2002. Source: Pew Research Center

This graph illustrates the change in attitudes over time about how important religion is to them personally. A growing proportion of Americans say it is not important, while the proportion that says it is very important have fallen by 12 percentage points since 2002. Source: Pew Research Center

He told DailyMail.com that as more Americans moved to major cities that provided anonymity and privacy, people became less religious because there was no cultural pressure from the small town to be seen in a bank every Sunday.

& # 39; I think that's the biggest factor (in the decline of religion in the US) & # 39 ;, he said.

More than half (57 percent) of Americans said it was bad that the US became less religious, while 31 percent said it was a good development.

On a personal level, 47 percent of Americans said that religion & # 39; very important & # 39; was in their lives, while 26 percent said it was somewhat important.

The most recent research data shows a decrease in the number of Americans who believe religion is very important, compared to 59 percent in 2002, when Pew first asked the question.

& # 39; It indicates that people are at least more willing to tell opinion polls that religion is not important, & # 39; said Fuller.

& # 39; We have seen that – especially among millennials – it is reassuring that they acknowledge that they are agnostic or atheist, & # 39; he added. & # 39; What turns them away from religion is the irrelevance of actual sexual ethics and the hypocrisy of persistent condemnation of lifestyle choices – they don't think anything is inherently wrong with (those lifestyles). & # 39;

This graph illustrates the proportion of Americans who believe that the role of religion in the US is more, less, or just as important as two decades ago. Source: Pew Research Center

This graph illustrates the proportion of Americans who believe that the role of religion in the US is more, less, or just as important as two decades ago. Source: Pew Research Center

This graph illustrates the proportion of Americans who believe that the role of religion in the US is more, less, or just as important as two decades ago. Source: Pew Research Center

In 2018, 26 percent of Americans said that religion was not at all so important or not at all on a personal level – as opposed to 14 percent in 2002.

At the same time, nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of Americans believe that family ties in the US have weakened over the past 20 years, while only 13 percent think they have become stronger and 20 percent report no change.

Nearly three-quarters (74 percent) said that this weakening of the family was bad for the country, while only 21 percent said it was a good development.

Among the 27 countries surveyed, Americans stood behind other nine countries in terms of the proportion of people in each nation who believe religion as & # 39; very important & # 39; in their lives.

Indonesia had the highest share (98 percent), followed by Tunisia (94 percent), Kenya (93 percent), the Philippines (90 percent), South Africa (82 percent), India (70 percent), Brazil (67 percent) , Mexico (52 percent) and Greece (48 percent).

Western Europe and the Scandinavian countries were significantly less inclined to consider religion important, such as: France (12 percent), Germany (21 percent), the Netherlands (17 percent) and Sweden (7 percent).

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