3D laser scans of Notre Dame Cathedral, recorded by the historian, can be used to save the building

The Windsor Castle fire of November 1992

On November 20, 1992, a fire broke out at Windsor Castle, causing major damage to the royal residence.

The Berkshire fire started at 11 am in the private chapel of Queen Victoria after a faulty floodlight lit a curtain next to the altar.

Within minutes the fire was extended to St George's Hall next door and the fire would destroy 115 rooms, including nine state rooms.

Three hours after the fire was dug up, 225 firefighters from seven provinces fought against the fire with 36 pumps to drain 1.5 million liters of water at the top of the inferno.

The firebreak on the other side of St George & # 39; s Hall remained unbleached, leaving the Koninklijke Bibliotheek undamaged.

On November 20, 1992, a fire broke out at Windsor Castle, causing major damage to the royal residence

On November 20, 1992, a fire broke out at Windsor Castle, causing major damage to the royal residence

The staff has worked to remove works of art from the Royal Collection from the path of fire.

According to the Royal Collection Trust: & # 39; The Castle & # 39; s Quadrangle was full of some of the finest examples of French 18th-century furniture, paintings by Van Dyck, Rubens and Gainsborough, Sèvres porcelain and other treasures from the collection .

Verb Amazingly, only two works of art were lost in the fire – a rosewood dresser and a very large painting by Sir William Beechey that could not be taken out of the wall in time. Fortunately, artworks were removed from many rooms before they would be rewired. & # 39;

The Duke of York said he had heard the fire alarm and about two or three minutes later he saw the smoke after leaving the room he was in, according to recent reports.

Prince Andrew had joined a group that removed valuable works of art from the castle to save them from destruction.

The York Minster fire of 1984

Pictured: aftermath of the fire in York Minster on July 9, 1984

Pictured: aftermath of the fire in York Minster on July 9, 1984

Pictured: aftermath of the fire in York Minster on July 9, 1984

Early in the morning of July 9, 1984, the south transept of York Minster caught fire, destroyed the roof and caused £ 2.25 million in damage.

More than 100 firefighters confronted the church fire and took two hours to get it on their heels.

The cause of the fire was probably a lightning flash that fell in the cathedral shortly after midnight.

The fire had severely damaged the brickwork of the cathedral, as well as the famous rose window, and firefighters hurled themselves on the floor after the roof collapsed at 4 o'clock in the morning.

Minster's staff and clergymen kept themselves busy storing as many artifacts as possible before the fire was finally brought under control around 5.24 am.

An investigation ruled out an electrical or gas error and arson was discounted due to the inaccessibility of the roof. Tests had shown that the eruption & # 39; almost certainly & # 39; was caused by a lightning strike but much of the evidence was destroyed in the fire.

The building was restored in 1988 after masonry teams had carved stone work over the building's rose window and arches again.

It was reported that the rose window, designed to celebrate the marriage of King Henry VII and Elizabeth of York, reached a temperature of 842 degrees during the incident, breaking the glass in different places before it was repaired.

It was not the first time that the building was on fire.

In the early hours of February 1, 1829, Jonathan Martin set the building on fire, melted the lead from the roof and cracked the limestone pillars of the building.

The fire started to die out in the late afternoon after about 230 feet of choir roof had collapsed.

Nonconformist Martin, a former sailor from Northumberland, did not believe in formal liturgy, had published pamphlets condemning the clergy as & # 39; adders of Hell & # 39 ;.

He was accused of setting fire to the building, but was not found guilty of insanity and died in 1838 in a London asylum.

On the photo: the roof of the southern transept of the York Minster burns at the height of the fire. Minster's staff and clergymen kept themselves busy preserving as many artifacts as possible before the fire was finally brought under control around 5.24 am.

On the photo: the roof of the southern transept of the York Minster burns at the height of the fire. Minster's staff and clergymen kept themselves busy preserving as many artifacts as possible before the fire was finally brought under control around 5.24 am.

On the photo: the roof of the southern transept of the York Minster burns at the height of the fire. Minster's staff and clergymen kept themselves busy preserving as many artifacts as possible before the fire was finally brought under control around 5.24 am.

The great fire of london

St Paul & # 39; s Cathedral (now pictured) caught fire, melting the lead roof and flowing into the street & # 39; like a river & # 39; when the building collapsed

St Paul & # 39; s Cathedral (now pictured) caught fire, melting the lead roof and flowing into the street & # 39; like a river & # 39; when the building collapsed

St Paul & # 39; s Cathedral (now pictured) caught fire, melting the lead roof and flowing into the street & # 39; like a river & # 39; when the building collapsed

On September 2, 1666, a fire broke out at Thomas Farriner's bakery in Pudding Lane, close to the London Bridge. The summer of 1666 had been unusually hot and the city had seen no rain for a few weeks, causing wooden houses and buildings to dry up.

Once the fire had started, 300 houses quickly collapsed and strong easterly winds spread the flames from house to house, the fire being swept through the winding narrow alleys of London, with houses placed close together.

In an attempt to escape the fire by boat, Londoners flocked to the River Thames and chaos overtook the city.

There was no fire department in London at the time, so residents had to fight the fire themselves with the help of local soldiers.

They used buckets of water, water splashes and fire hooks, pulling houses with hooks down to create holes or & # 39; fire breaks & # 39; but the wind helped blow the fire over the created holes.

King Charles II had ordered houses to be pulled down the path of the fire – but the fire exceeded the angled poles used to achieve this.

By September 4, half of London had been overtaken by the fire, and King Charles, along with firefighters, began to deliver buckets of water in a desperate attempt to control the flames.

Gunpowder was used to blow up houses lying in the fire of the path, but the sound of explosions caused rumors of a French invasion, which increased the panic of the city.

St Paul & # 39; s Cathedral caught fire, with the lead roof melting and flowing down the street & # 39; like a river & # 39; when the cathedral collapsed.

The fire was finally brought under control and extinguished on September 6, leaving only one fifth of London untouched.

Almost every civilian building was destroyed, along with 13,000 private residences, 87 parish churches, The Royal Exchange and Guildhall.

Around 350,000 people lived in London just before the Great Fire, making the city one of the largest in Europe.

A monument was erected in Pudding Lane, where the fire broke out.

On September 4, half of London was overtaken by the eruption and King Charles, along with firefighters, transferred buckets of water in a desperate attempt to control the fire (photo: an illustration from 1834)

On September 4, half of London was overtaken by the eruption, and King Charles, along with firefighters, went to give buckets of water in a desperate attempt to control the fire (photo: an illustration from 1834)

On September 4, half of London was overtaken by the eruption and King Charles, along with firefighters, transferred buckets of water in a desperate attempt to control the fire (photo: an illustration from 1834)

The great fire of Rome, 64AD

The Great Fire of Rome, during the reign of Emperor Nero in 64AD, devastated much of the city after the flames started in the slums south of the aristocratic Palatine hill.

Strong winds sparked the fire to the north, scorching houses on its way, creating panic during the three-day period of the inferno.

Hundreds died in the blaze and thousands became homeless. Three of the 14 districts were completely destroyed and only four remained completely unaffected.

That emperor Nero & # 39; played while the city burned & # 39; has become a popular legend, but is not correct. The emperor was 35 miles away in Antium when the fire broke out and could use his palace as a hideout. And the violin was not invented yet.

Nero, who used fire as an opportunity to rebuild the city in a more Greek style, accused Christians of the fire and ordered the arrest, torture and execution of hundreds of faithful believers.

Historian Tacitus said the fire was & # 39; more serious and terrible than any other that had happened to this city & # 39 ;.