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ABC President Ita Buttrose (photo) has admitted that accusations that the national broadcaster has a political preference have some merit

& # 39; We may be biased & # 39 ;: the new ABC chair Ita Buttrose admits that the broadcaster lacks a diversity of views – after it has been knocked down for left-wing group thinking

  • ABC chair Ita Buttrose admitted that they have to show more views
  • She asked the ABC staff not to worry about losing jobs after spending cuts
  • Buttrose said she will meet the new minister of communication about the future of ABC
  • She said there are no plans to close off branches of radio or television stations
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The ABC president Ita Buttrose has admitted that accusations that the national broadcaster has a political preference have some merit.

Conservative critics have accused the ABC and its presenters of a left-wing bias, and the chairman has admitted that some presenters have expressed their own views and that there is a lack of alternative views.

Buttrose joined the ABC in February after the resignation of her predecessor Justin Milne.

ABC President Ita Buttrose (photo) has admitted that accusations that the national broadcaster has a political preference have some merit

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ABC President Ita Buttrose (photo) has admitted that accusations that the national broadcaster has a political preference have some merit

& # 39; Sometimes I think we are biased, & # 39; Mrs. Buttrose said to ABC Radio Melbourne on Wednesday. & # 39; Sometimes we can do with more diversity of views. I have no problem with anyone's opinion, but I think we should make sure that ours is as diverse as we can.

& # 39; Let people pass on a prejudice without really knowing it. I think we can all do that. But the way you reject the critics who want to give us a difficult time is by having a broader point of view. & # 39;

Buttrose (photo with Prime Minister Scott Morrison and former communications minister, Mitch Fifield) asked the ABC staff not to worry about job losses after the annual cessation of funding indexation from July 2019, making the organization cost $ 84 million over three years

Buttrose (photo with Prime Minister Scott Morrison and former communications minister, Mitch Fifield) asked the ABC staff not to worry about job losses after the annual cessation of funding indexation from July 2019, making the organization cost $ 84 million over three years

Buttrose (photo with Prime Minister Scott Morrison and former communications minister, Mitch Fifield) asked the ABC staff not to worry about job losses after the annual cessation of funding indexation from July 2019, making the organization cost $ 84 million over three years

Buttrose, a one-time Australian of the year, was chosen to lead the ABC at a time when the broadcaster was restless following the resignation of former managing director Michelle Guthrie.

Mrs. Guthrie claimed that she was pressured from above to dismiss chief economics correspondent Emma Alberici and political editor Andrew Probyn for allegedly criticizing the coalition government.

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Mr. Milne, however, denied allegations that he wanted to fire journalists.

Buttrose asked the ABC staff not to worry about job losses after the annual cessation of July 2019 funding indexation, which will cost $ 84 million in three years.

She said there were no plans to close ABC's radio and television branches.

& # 39; There are many things that can be cut. There are many things that can be changed, & she said.

Buttrose will meet with the new communications minister, Paul Fletcher, to discuss the future of the broadcaster next week and, if necessary, look for funds. (pictured the ABC building in Sydney)

Buttrose will meet with the new communications minister, Paul Fletcher, to discuss the future of the broadcaster next week and, if necessary, look for funds. (pictured the ABC building in Sydney)

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Buttrose will meet with the new communications minister, Paul Fletcher, to discuss the future of the broadcaster next week and, if necessary, look for funds. (pictured the ABC building in Sydney)

Buttrose will meet with new communications minister Paul Fletcher to discuss the future of the broadcaster next week and will look for money if necessary.

"It is not good hum and moan," said Mrs. Buttrose. "We need to present a case why we need it, what it is for, where it takes us, what our plans are for the future, what the digital impact will be on the way we broadcast," she said .

The Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA) said that nearly $ 340 million has been cut from the basic ABC financing since 2014.

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