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Different cultures participate in a variety of wedding habits, such as slaughtering chickens, walking in-laws and guests kissing the bride and groom (stock image)

Marriage is the most celebrated occasion in many countries around the world.

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But marital traditions differ considerably from one culture to another, with some practicing weird and wonderful customs.

From slaughtering chickens to walking across your in-laws, FEMAIL looks at nine of & # 39; the world's most bizarre wedding traditions.

Different cultures participate in a variety of wedding habits, such as slaughtering chickens, walking in-laws and guests kissing the bride and groom (stock image)

Different cultures participate in a variety of wedding habits, such as slaughtering chickens, walking in-laws and guests kissing the bride and groom (stock image)

Crying your eyes – China

Among the Tujia people of China, the brides are expected to express excitement about their upcoming wedding by crying for an hour every day in the run-up to their wedding.

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The bride's female family members gradually join in, with the bride's mother starting on day 10 and the grandmother starting on day 20.

Sisters and cousins ​​were admitted towards the end of the month, making the whole matriarchal side of the family cry as one.

Chicken not gone – Mongolia

Mongolian couples hoping to get married must first kill a baby chicken together and hold the knife with both hands when they cut it apart.

The goal is to find a healthy liver.

Once found, the two can set a wedding date.

In Mongolia, soon-to-be married couples must slaughter a baby chicken before setting a wedding date (stock image)

In Mongolia, soon-to-be married couples must slaughter a baby chicken before setting a wedding date (stock image)

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In Mongolia, soon-to-be married couples must slaughter a baby chicken before setting a wedding date (stock image)

Stepping up the in-laws – French Polynesia

On the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia, the bride's family gets the short straw.

When the ceremony is over, family members must lie side by side on the floor so that the bride and groom can walk over them.

Practice symbolizes the transition to marriage.

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Beating feet – South Korea

As part of the traditional Falaka ceremony at South Korean weddings, family members and friends of the groom are holding him while patting the soles of his feet with dried fish.

In accordance with custom, he asked general questions of knowledge between strokes.

The exercise is said to improve his memory (and his feet).

Elsewhere in Korean culture, Valentine's Day is not limited to February 14.

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The 14th day of every month has special romantic significance for couples.

Newlyweds walk on the backs of the bride's relatives after the wedding ceremony on the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia (stock image)

Newlyweds walk on the backs of the bride's relatives after the wedding ceremony on the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia (stock image)

Newlyweds walk on the backs of the bride's relatives after the wedding ceremony on the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia (stock image)

10 FASCINATING JEWISH WEDDING TRADITIONS

1. Fasting

In the Jewish tradition, the wedding day is considered a day of forgiveness. Some couples choose to fast until their first meal together after the ceremony.

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2. Cover (auction)

Unlike many other traditions, a groom who sees his bride before the wedding is not a bad omen in Jewish culture.

Before the ceremony, the groom approaches the bride for covering – veiled – to look at her and veil her face herself, indicating that his love for her goes beyond her physical beauty.

The covering also symbolizes that the husband and wife remain two different individuals, even after marriage.

3. Signing of the Ketubah

The Ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract that sets out the responsibilities of the groom towards the bride.

Ketubahs are part of Jewish civil law and lay the framework for marriage protection and rights if the couple divorce.

4. The Chuppah

The Chuppah has four corners and a roofed roof to symbolize the house that a newlywed couple will build together.

In some ceremonies, the four posts of the chuppah are held by family and friends who support the next chapter of the couple as a husband and wife.

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5. Circle

The Jewish bride traditionally circles the groom three or seven times under the Chuppah.

Some sources say that this is done to create a barrier of protection against evil, temptation and the eyes of other women, while others believe that the circling bride symbolizes the creation of a new family circle.

In modern Judaism, the bride and groom circle around each other.

7. Sheva B & rachot (Seven Blessings)

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The seven blessings come from ancient Hebrew texts and are read in both Hebrew and English.

The blessings focus on love, joy and celebration for the couple.

8. Breaking the glass

At the end of a Jewish wedding ceremony, the groom – and in more recent years the bride – is invited to step on a glass in a cloth bag to shatter it.

Some believe that the ritual represents the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem, while others say it demonstrates the multifaceted nature of marriage and the dedication to assist each other in difficult and good times.

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Many Jewish couples keep the shards of broken glass and include them in a memento of the wedding day.

9. Mazel Tov!

This well-known Jewish wedding tradition happens immediately after shattering the glass, where guests wish the couple good luck.

10. Yichud (seclusion)

After the ceremony, the Jewish custom dictates that couples spend about 18 minutes together in yichud seclusion.

The concept is designed to give newlyweds time to think privately about their efforts.

Source: Brides.com

Spitting on the bride – Kenya

At the Maasai tribal community in Kenya, superstition warns against supporting a newlywed couple too much.

That is why the bride's fathers spit on their daughters while they leave with their new husband.

Too much encouragement is supposed to seduce fate in the Maasai culture.

In the Maasai culture, showing open support for a couple is a bad omen, so that the father of the bride spits the newlyweds upon leaving the ceremony (stock image)

In the Maasai culture, showing open support for a couple is a bad omen, so that the father of the bride spits the newlyweds upon leaving the ceremony (stock image)

In the Maasai culture, showing open support for a couple is a bad omen, so that the father of the bride spits the newlyweds upon leaving the ceremony (stock image)

Taking a bite – Russia

Newly-married Russian couples enjoy a sweet bread called karavay during their reception dinner.

Decorated with wheat for prosperity and interlocking rings that symbolize loyalty and loyalty, the karavay is offered to men and women.

Whoever takes the bigger bite without using his hands is considered the head of the family.

Hold it – Borneo

A tribe in Borneo limits newlyweds to three days after the wedding in their marital home – without access to a toilet.

It is believed that the bizarre habit of constant surveillance and limited movement brings happiness to the couple, Lonely planet reports.

Armenian couples put lavash bread (photo) on their shoulders as a symbol of wealth and prosperity

Armenian couples put lavash bread (photo) on their shoulders as a symbol of wealth and prosperity

Armenian couples put lavash bread (photo) on their shoulders as a symbol of wealth and prosperity

Balancing bread – Armenia

At Armenian weddings, the mothers of the bride and groom place lavash – flatbread from the Middle East – on the shoulders of the newlyweds as a symbol of wealth and prosperity.

& # 39; You can now kiss the bride & # 39; – Sweden

In accordance with tradition, male guests at Swedish weddings are free to steal a kiss from the bride when the groom leaves the table.

Similarly, female guests are free to kiss the groom when the bride's back is turned.

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