Advertisements
Alan Jones destroyed the New South Wales premiere after defending Sydney's exclusion laws. Pictured: Sydney DJ Tori Levett who campaigned against the laws

Alan Jones destroyed the New South Wales premiere after defending Sydney's exclusion laws.

Advertisements

Announcing a review of controversial laws, Gladys Berejiklian said that the number of attacks has fallen since they came into effect in 2014.

But Firebrand radio presenter Jones did not buy her argument and said they should be demolished immediately.

& # 39; Your dope. Of course it was refused. There is no one to be violent against. The place is a mortuary, & he said on his 2GB show on Wednesday morning.

Alan Jones destroyed the New South Wales premiere after defending Sydney's exclusion laws. Pictured: Sydney DJ Tori Levett who campaigned against the laws

Alan Jones destroyed the New South Wales premiere after defending Sydney's exclusion laws. Pictured: Sydney DJ Tori Levett who campaigned against the laws

Gladys Berejiklian said the number of attacks had fallen since the laws came into force in 2014. But firebrand radio host Jones (photo) did not buy her argument

Gladys Berejiklian said the number of attacks had fallen since the laws came into force in 2014. But firebrand radio host Jones (photo) did not buy her argument

Advertisements

Gladys Berejiklian said the number of attacks had fallen since the laws came into force in 2014. But firebrand radio host Jones (photo) did not buy her argument

The state government announced on Wednesday that a parliamentary committee of various parties will look into the laws as part of a discussion of the nighttime economy of Sydney.

All options are on the table, including the deletion or amendment of the laws, but the committee does not report to parliament until September 30.

& # 39; This is about closing the gate after the horse gets stuck, & # 39; said Jones. & # 39; Gladys Berejiklian is far too careful. & # 39;

& # 39; These laws have paralyzed business and paralyzed Sydney as an international city. The reputation is damaged. They must be abandoned. Open the city. & # 39;

Jones said that the laws that limit trading hours in the CBD and Kings Cross are a & # 39;flashy reaction to the tragic death of a young man. & # 39;

& # 39; We want an international city or we don't, and instead of wasting time or money on lockout legislation that has already destroyed things, tip some more money into the police, & # 39; he said.

In the past: neon advertising on the infamous Darlinghurst Rd at Kings Cross in Sydney in 2003
Advertisements

In the past: neon advertising on the infamous Darlinghurst Rd at Kings Cross in Sydney in 2003

In the past: neon advertising on the infamous Darlinghurst Rd at Kings Cross in Sydney in 2003

Jones said the laws that limit trading hours in the CBD and Kings Cross (photo), a flashy response to the tragic death of a young man & # 39; goods.

Jones said the laws that limit trading hours in the CBD and Kings Cross (photo), a flashy response to the tragic death of a young man & # 39; goods.

Jones said the laws that limit trading hours in the CBD and Kings Cross (photo), a flashy response to the tragic death of a young man & # 39; goods.

The Cuban site (photo) blamed the exclusion laws when it was closed earlier this year

The Cuban site (photo) blamed the exclusion laws when it was closed earlier this year

Advertisements

The Cuban site (photo) blamed the exclusion laws when it was closed earlier this year

The state government has announced that a committee will look at the laws as part of a discussion of the Sydney economy. Pictured: Sydney DJ Tori Levett who campaigned against the laws

The state government has announced that a committee will look at the laws as part of a discussion of the Sydney economy. Pictured: Sydney DJ Tori Levett who campaigned against the laws

The state government has announced that a committee will look at the laws as part of a discussion of the Sydney economy. Pictured: Sydney DJ Tori Levett who campaigned against the laws

The NSW joint select committee will consult with NSW Police and health, community, entertainment and music groups.

The prime minister said non-domestic attacks in the CBD and Kings Cross have been falling since 2014, when the government introduced exclusion laws in response to alcohol-smoked violence that killed two teenagers.

Advertisements

& # 39; During this period we have also worked to ease certain aspects of the legislation, such as extending opening times for bars and clubs for large events, and making it easier for small bars, restaurants and caf├ęs to start up and to work, & # 39; said Mrs. Berejiklian. in a statement on Wednesday.

The exclusion laws

Lock-outs and last drinks: 1.30am lock-outs and 3am last drinks in hotels, registered clubs, night clubs and karaoke bars with license in the exclusion area

Temporary prohibitions: From 48 hours for troublemakers

Ban sales: From shots and doubles. And you can't buy more than four drinks after midnight and two drinks after 2:00 AM

ID scanners: Are mandatory for any location in designated areas

Advertisements

Liquor licenses: Biennial freezing of approvals for new and existing licenses

Licensee fines: Up to $ 11,000 and / or 12 months imprisonment for non-compliance with the new laws.

Withdrawal of competence cards and disqualifications: (Up to 12 months) for the staff of the bar that violates the responsible service for alcohol requirements.

& # 39; After five years of working, it makes sense that we now take stock and investigate whether further changes need to be made. & # 39;

The committee will look at all the measures needed to maintain and improve the health outcomes and safety of the community, to improve the night economy and to ensure that regulation – including exclusion laws – is kept in balance.

It comes after a new political party that wants to end the lockout legislation called Keep Sydney Open, scored 70,000 votes in the March election.

A Deloitte report earlier this year found that Sydney was missing $ 16 billion because of the weak night economy.

The figures from the city of Sydney show that foot traffic in the entertainment center of Kings Cross has fallen by 84 percent and that pubs have fallen by 60 percent.

The story was similar on Oxford Street, where iconic locations were forced to close their doors in the face of huge losses.

At the last count in May 2018, data from NSW Racing and Gaming revealed that 418 licensed properties have been closed since 2014 and that only 242 new licenses have been issued – a net loss of 176 locations.

Advertisements

They include old favorites such as Backroom, Soho, The Flinders, Trademark, The Bourbon and Q-Bar.

Kings Cross institution Hugo & # 39; s Lounge and Pizza Bar went bankrupt and fell into administration less than two years after the entry into force of the laws.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian (left) and NSW Minister of Transport and Waterways Andrew Constance (right)

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian (left) and NSW Minister of Transport and Waterways Andrew Constance (right)

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian (left) and NSW Minister of Transport and Waterways Andrew Constance (right)

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news