& # 39; Swarmageddon & # 39; of more than 1,000 small quakes, new fears of megag gratification in southern California

& # 39; Swarmageddon & # 39; of more than 1,000 small earthquakes in less than a month creates new fears of a megag containment in southern California

  • San Bernardino and Riverside County have seen hundreds of quakes in 3 weeks
  • Spike in small earthquakes can increase the chance of a larger one, experts say
  • However, for the time being scientists say that the chance of a large event is small

A wave of small earthquakes in Southern California gives seismologists yet another opportunity to remind residents that they must always be prepared for the next major event.

While small earthquakes of magnitude 3 and below occur almost daily, a recent swarm has produced more than 1,000 temblors in the last three weeks, creating the fear that something more destructive might be coming, according to the LA Times.

Fortunately, experts say this is not the case this time, but they warn that a major earthquake in the region is ultimately inevitable.

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A wave of small earthquakes in Southern California gives seismologists yet another opportunity to remind residents that they must always be prepared for the next major event. Small earthquakes in the last few weeks in the state are shown above

A wave of small earthquakes in Southern California gives seismologists yet another opportunity to remind residents that they must always be prepared for the next major event. Small earthquakes in the last few weeks in the state are shown above

The swarm has given rise to hundreds of earthquakes in the provinces of San Bernardino and Riverside in recent weeks, LA Times reports.

Three years ago it is reminiscent of activity near the San Andreas Fault, where a number of scientists were keen on a possible major triggered earthquake.

Although that never happened, a peak in small earthquakes can increase the chance of a larger event, although only slightly.

Scientists say that people live in the earthquake prone state

& # 39; I would redefine the normal as: you still need to be prepared for a major earthquake & # 39 ;, Andrew Llenos, a geophysicist from the US Geological Survey, told the LA Times.

& # 39; We know that a major earthquake will happen sometime in the future & # 39 ;.

At the start of this year, Los Angeles released an earthquake warning app designed to give residents a precious few seconds to drop, cover, and hold in the event of an earthquake.

ShakeAlertLA became available for download on Android and Apple phones.

Based on a warning system developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the app alerts users when there is an earthquake of magnitude 5.0 or higher in the status.

Los Angeles recently released an earthquake warning app that could give LA County residents a few seconds' head start to seek cover in the event of tremors

Los Angeles recently released an earthquake warning app that could give LA County residents a few seconds' head start to seek cover in the event of tremors

Los Angeles recently released an earthquake warning app that could give LA County residents a few seconds' head start to seek cover in the event of tremors

HOW ARE EARTHQUAKES MEASURED?

Earthquakes are detected by following the size, or magnitude, and intensity of the shock waves they produce, known as seismic waves.

The magnitude of an earthquake differs from the intensity.

The magnitude of an earthquake refers to the measurement of the energy released when the earthquake originated.

The size is calculated based on measurements on seismographs.

The intensity of an earthquake refers to how strong the shaking produced by the sensation is.

A 5.3-magnitude earthquake hit the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California on Thursday at 10.30 am

A 5.3-magnitude earthquake hit the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California on Thursday at 10.30 am

A 5.3-magnitude earthquake hit the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California on Thursday at 10.30 am

According to the United States Geological Survey, & # 39; intensity is determined by the effects on people, human structures and the natural environment & # 39 ;.

Earthquakes originate below the surface of the earth in a region called the hypocenter.

During an earthquake, part of a seismograph remains stationary and part moves with the surface of the earth.

The earthquake is then measured by the difference in the positions of the stationary and moving parts of the seismograph.

Depending on where the earthquake strikes, the app says that the warning could arrive before, during or after the earthquake.

It encourages people who see the warning or feel the vibration to take precautions to prevent injury, and can provide up to ten seconds prior to tremors in the area.

& # 39; I actually think today we can say that ShakeAlert is the most advanced earthquake warning system in the world & # 39 ;, said Richard Allen, director of the Seismological Laboratory at UC Berkeley after an earlier system test.

& # 39; The challenge is to get that report to every individual in the state of California or in the Pacific Northwest.

& # 39; The reason is that the technology for reporting all 8 million residents of the Bay Area within a second does not exist today. & # 39;

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