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Anatoly Karpov (photo) was convinced that he was given a slogan during his match against Viktor Korchnoi in 1978

Supernatural powers employed by the best athletes in the world are revealed in a new book, including shaman curses and headstands to & # 39; tip & # 39 ;.

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Whether by coincidence or due to poorly understood psychological conditions, many of & # 39; the world's greatest athletes claim to have experienced super powers.

A new book by sports journalist Ed Hawkins & # 39;, & # 39; The Men on Magic Carpets: Searching the Superhuman Sports Star & # 39; examines the athletes, their coaches and even the states they represent who tried to gain an advantage through the mystical.

In 1978, for example, two Soviet masters Anatoly Karpov and Viktor Korchnoi collided with a chess party in the Philippines.

Korchnoi, who later died, was tortured by voices in his head accusing him of being a Soviet traitor – not only that, but he knew that they were being led to him by a suitable man in the front row.

Anatoly Karpov (photo) was convinced that he was given a slogan during his match against Viktor Korchnoi in 1978

Anatoly Karpov (photo) was convinced that he was given a slogan during his match against Viktor Korchnoi in 1978

American heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali, training before his fight with Henry Cooper - he was famous for prophesying which round he would knock out his opponents
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American heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali, training before his fight with Henry Cooper - he was famous for prophesying which round he would knock out his opponents

American heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali, training before his fight with Henry Cooper – he was famous for prophesying which round he would knock out his opponents

Another formidable boxer, Sugar Ray Robinson (photo) had a morbid nightmare that he would kill Jimmy Doyle the night before their fight in 1947

Another formidable boxer, Sugar Ray Robinson (photo) had a morbid nightmare that he would kill Jimmy Doyle the night before their fight in 1947

Another formidable boxer, Sugar Ray Robinson (photo) had a morbid nightmare that he would kill Jimmy Doyle the night before their fight in 1947

During the competition, Korchnoi demanded that Dr. Vladimir Zoukhar, the well-dressed USSR hypnotist who came as part of the Karpov team, sat at the back of the hall.

But his only remedy was to stand on his head between his rounds to try and cast the mean powers off his head. While Karpov had brought his hypnotist, Korchnoi had recruited two yogis to neutralize the threat.

After his loss, Korchnoi protested: & # 39; I expected to play one against one. Instead, the entire Red Army led by Zoukhar was against me. & # 39;

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This breathtaking history is revealed in the book of sports journalist Ed Hawkins, & # 39; The Men on Magic Carpets: Searching for the Superhuman Sports Star. & # 39;

Hawkins met Mike Murphy, an American who had dedicated his life to accessing superpowers he & # 39; siddhi & # 39; s & # 39; , & # 39; after he learned from an Indian guru.

One of the techniques he learned & # 39; enabled him to put baseball pitchers on their a **, & # 39; Hawkins writes.

Sitting in the grandstand of the 1964 fight between the San Francisco Giants and the LA dodgers, he recruited hundreds of fans to help him shower the Los Angeles pitcher with negative energy.

Murphy claims that his shamanic curse brought Bob Gibson to the ground.

Ed Hawkins - known for his football and cricket writing - has & # 39; The Men on Magic Carpets: Searching the Superhuman Sports Star & # 39; written
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Ed Hawkins - known for his football and cricket writing - has & # 39; The Men on Magic Carpets: Searching the Superhuman Sports Star & # 39; written

Ed Hawkins – known for his football and cricket writing – has & # 39; The Men on Magic Carpets: Searching the Superhuman Sports Star & # 39; written

Although the claims may sound strange, Hawkins quotes the opinion of an expert from a Princeton University scientist who made a crowd experiment on a pinball machine in 1995.

Dean Readin discovered that the singing of the crowd at fever height & # 39; the quantum level of reality & # 39; influence the pinball machines in a consistent pattern that was not in accordance with pure coincidence.

This & # 39; quantity level of reality & # 39; would perhaps be appreciated by the heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali who was famous for prophesying the exact round he would cut off his opponents.

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Another formidable boxer, Sugar Ray Robinson had a morbid nightmare that he would kill Jimmy Doyle the night before their attack in 1947.

During the Welterweight World Championship, Robinson hit Doyle with a blow that struck & # 39; Jimmy rigidly & # 39 ;, Nat Fleischer reported in The Ring Magazine.

He never regained consciousness and died in a hospital in Cleveland.

Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California - in 1964 Mike Murphy told Hawkins that he used siddhi power to put a baseball-pitcher on his back

Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California - in 1964 Mike Murphy told Hawkins that he used siddhi power to put a baseball-pitcher on his back

Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California – in 1964 Mike Murphy told Hawkins that he used siddhi power to put a baseball-pitcher on his back

The English Joe Root shoots a ride in the Rose Bowl against the West Indies - researchers discovered that an & # 39; optimum condition & # 39; generated by noise from the crowd a 90 mph ball appears to be able to travel to a batsman at 80 mph
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The English Joe Root shoots a ride in the Rose Bowl against the West Indies - researchers discovered that an & # 39; optimum condition & # 39; generated by noise from the crowd a 90 mph ball appears to be able to travel to a batsman at 80 mph

The English Joe Root shoots a ride in the Rose Bowl against the West Indies – researchers discovered that an & # 39; optimum condition & # 39; generated by noise from the crowd a 90 mph ball appears to be able to travel to a batsman at 80 mph

Other sports stars have their ability to & # 39; the power status & # 39; to enter, reported if time is delayed.

Hawkins describes how California & # 39; s HeartMath Institute a & # 39; optimum condition & # 39; when the thundering cheers of a stadium could cause this slow motion effect in the brain of an athlete.

& # 39; When in that "optimum state," someone's "reaction time" is 37 milliseconds faster, "Hawkins writes. It may not sound much, but that would seem like a 90 mph cricket ball coming down with the 80 mph wicket.

Whether you accept science or not, Hawkins tells us: & # 39; If there is anything to get out of this book, it is that there are people who believe. & # 39;

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