Advertisements
Harrison & # 39; Jack & # 39; Schmitt, 83, trained like a geologist before fraying our satellite with Apollo 17 and spent hours collecting and studying the fine particles of the surface

People can be ALLERGIC for lunar dust: the last man who visits the moon reveals his NOSE swollen after the last Apollo mission

  • Harrison & # 39; Jack & # 39; Schmitt, 83, was a geologist aboard the Apollo 17 space shuttle
  • He spoke about his reaction to the moon dust at the Starmus space festival in Zurich
  • When he took off his suit, he said that his nose was swollen, but others reacted worse
Advertisements

An Apollo astronaut who landed on the moon in 1972 has revealed that people can be allergic to dust on the surface of the moon after it swells his nose.

Advertisements

Harrison & # 39; Jack & # 39; Schmitt, 83, studied geology before traveling to our satellite on Apollo 17 and spending hours collecting and studying the fine particles of the surface.

He told a congregation at the Starmus space festival in Zurich that when he took off his protective gear and treated the dust immediately, he reacted immediately.

Mr. Schmitt claims that future missions must protect people against the corrosive dust if we want to colonize the moon.

Scroll down for video

Harrison & # 39; Jack & # 39; Schmitt, 83, trained like a geologist before fraying our satellite with Apollo 17 and spent hours collecting and studying the fine particles of the surface

Advertisements

Harrison & # 39; Jack & # 39; Schmitt, 83, trained like a geologist before fraying our satellite with Apollo 17 and spent hours collecting and studying the fine particles of the surface

Mr. Schmitt (pictured here on the moon in 1972) told a congregation at the Starmus space festival in Zurich that he immediately reacted after he collected the samples and when he took off his protective equipment and treated the dust.

Mr. Schmitt (pictured here on the moon in 1972) told a congregation at the Starmus space festival in Zurich that he immediately reacted after he collected the samples and when he took off his protective equipment and treated the dust.

Mr. Schmitt (pictured here on the moon in 1972) told a congregation at the Starmus space festival in Zurich that he immediately reacted after he collected the samples and when he took off his protective equipment and treated the dust.

THE & # 39; LUNAR HAY FEVER & # 39; FROM THE APOLLO ASTRONAUTS

When astronauts visited the moon during the Apollo missions, the electrostatically charged lunar floor clung to their space suits, letting moon dust be released into the environment by astronauts who had explored the lunar surface, the team said.

Astronaut Harrison Schmitt described his reaction to lunar dust as & # 39; lunar hay fever & # 39 ;, including sneezing, watery eyes, and sore throat.

Advertisements

& # 39; The first time I smelled the dust, I got an allergic reaction, the inside of my nose became swollen, you heard it in my voice, & # 39; said Mr. Schmitt, The Telegraph reports.

& # 39; But that gradually passed for me, and by the fourth time I sucked up moon dust, I didn't notice it. & # 39;

He went further into the bizarre response and said that some people had a more serious reason than others.

Mr. Schmitt said: & # 39; A flight surgeon unpacking the Apollo 17 command module after we fell down, he had such a reaction that he had to stop doing what he was doing.

& # 39; For some people, we need to find out if they will get a response if they are chronically exposed to moon dust.

Advertisements

& # 39; My suggestion is to never have them exposed to moon dust and there have been many technical solutions since I flew to keep dust out of the cabin to keep it from the suit. This is primarily a technical problem. & # 39;

He continued the bizarre response and said that some people had a more serious reason than others, with one astronaut unable to continue a task because of a serious reaction

He continued the bizarre response and said that some people had a more serious reason than others, with one astronaut unable to continue a task because of a serious reaction

He continued the bizarre response and said that some people had a more serious reason than others, with one astronaut unable to continue a task because of a serious reaction

Moon dust is also notoriously corrosive and carried through three of the Kevlar layers that formed Mr Schmitt's space boots (photo)

Moon dust is also notoriously corrosive and carried through three of the Kevlar layers that formed Mr Schmitt's space boots (photo)

Moon dust is also notoriously corrosive and carried through three of the Kevlar layers that formed Mr Schmitt's space boots (photo)

Advertisements

Moon dust is also notoriously corrosive and can wear through various Kevlar layers that form the astronaut's boots.

The lack of an atmosphere or wind on the moon means that the particles are not worn out and, after a while, smoothed out, such as on earth.

Instead, they remain coarse and behave like sandpaper when they stick in the crevices of space suits.

An earlier study also found that it could contain links to lung cancer.

& # 39; Moon dust is one of the many dangers people will face when performing surface missions & # 39 ;, researchers from Stony Brook University said in a study last year.

Advertisements

The same problem is caused by Mars missions and it can be worse for those who land on the red planet because it is potentially toxic due to the high concentration of iron oxide.

WHO HAS BEEN TO THE MOON?

Twelve people walked the moon in total.

1 + 2. Apollo 11 – July 21, 1969

Neil Armstrong made history by being the first person to set foot on the moon.

Edwin & # 39; Buzz & # 39; Aldrin followed Neil Armstrong to the surface of the moon. His popular nickname gave himself to the animated character Buzz Lightyear.

Advertisements

3 + 4. Apollo 12 – 19 and 20 November 1969

Pete Conrad and Alan Bean were the moon walkers on the Apollo 12 mission.

The Apollo 12 team experienced two lightning strikes just after their Saturn V rocket was launched.

5 + 6. Apollo 14 – 5 February 1971

Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell who were part of the Apollo 14 mission. They launched on January 31, 1971 and landed in the Fra Mauro area of ​​the moon, the original destination for Apollo 13.

Advertisements

7 + 8. Apollo July 15 – 31, 1971

David Scott and James Irwin landed on the moon and stayed for three days, until 2 August.

9 + 10. Apollo 16 – 21 April 1972

John Young and Charles Duke were the next men to walk on the moon. When the crew reached the moon orbit, the mission almost had to be interrupted due to a problem with the main engine of the Command / Service Module.

11 + 12. Apollo 17 – December 11, 1972

Advertisements

The last people to walk on the moon were Eugene (Gene) Cernan and Harrison (Jack) Schmitt.

Before leaving the moon, Cernan scratched the initials of his daughter Tracy in the moon's regolith. Because the moon does not experience weather conditions such as wind or rain to erode something away, its initials must remain there for a very long time.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) sciencetech