Advertisements
The megalithic site has 144 granite blocks that are more than six feet long and is & # 39; Spanish Stonehenge & # 39; called. The stones vary in age from 4,000 to 5,000 years old and it has returned to Spain after being under the bottom of a reservoir for 50 years

A 5,000-year-old monument returned to Spain after being submerged in the bottom of a reservoir for 50 years.

Advertisements

The megalithic site has 144 granite blocks that are more than six feet long and is & # 39; Spanish Stonehenge & # 39; called.

The resemblance to the UNESCO World Heritage in Wiltshire is striking, but the Iberian version is much smaller.

It was thought that it was condemned to the history books in the 1960s when a Spanish general ordered the construction of a hydroelectric dam in Peraleda de la Mata, near Cáceres in Extremadura.

However, due to a severe and prolonged drought, the structure was created when the last drops of water disappeared from the bare basin.

Scroll down for video

The megalithic site has 144 granite blocks that are more than six feet long and is & # 39; Spanish Stonehenge & # 39; called. The stones vary in age from 4,000 to 5,000 years old and it has returned to Spain after being under the bottom of a reservoir for 50 years

Advertisements

The megalithic site has 144 granite blocks that are more than six feet long and is & # 39; Spanish Stonehenge & # 39; called. The stones vary in age from 4,000 to 5,000 years old and it has returned to Spain after being under the bottom of a reservoir for 50 years

Western Spain is plagued by a year-long drought and the Bronze Age structure, thought to be an ancient temple, can now be seen.

Hugo Obermaier, a German priest and amateur archaeologist, found the site for the first time in 1925.

Because of the unfortunate decision-making of General Franco, who chose to send the site to the dark when he ordered a flood on a river on the Tagus River.

But before the rediscovery and subsequent collapse, it is thought that the stones would have centered around a central room for sun worship.

The builders and inhabitants of the region are not certain, but historians assume that it would probably have been the Celts, who lived on the Iberian Peninsula 4000 years ago.

Part of the stone shaves a strange stone arrangement around them, which may have been part of an old funeral ritual.

Advertisements

& # 39; The stones were brought from about five miles to form this temple, which we think was used to worship the sun, & # 39; Ángel Castaño, president of the Cultural Association of Peraleda, told the Times.

& # 39; That way it has similarities with Stonehenge, but it is clearly smaller.

& # 39; The people here had heard about it, but had never seen it. We want the authorities to move these stones to the shores of the reservoir and use them as a tourist attraction, because few people come to this area. & # 39;

Radiocarbon dating from the & # 39; Spanish Stonehenge & # 39; found the stones range in age from around 4,000 to 5,000 years old and this links them curiously to the history of Stonehenge. The first monolith structure in Europe was found in Brittany dating from 4,794 BC. And other early monuments (red) were found in northwestern France, the Channel Islands, Catalonia, southwestern France, Corsica and Sardinia from a similar period

Radiocarbon dating from the & # 39; Spanish Stonehenge & # 39; found the stones range in age from around 4,000 to 5,000 years old and this links them curiously to the history of Stonehenge. The first monolith structure in Europe was found in Brittany dating from 4,794 BC. And other early monuments (red) were found in northwestern France, the Channel Islands, Catalonia, southwestern France, Corsica and Sardinia from a similar period

Radiocarbon dating from the & # 39; Spanish Stonehenge & # 39; found the stones range in age from around 4,000 to 5,000 years old and this links them curiously to the history of Stonehenge. The first monolith structure in Europe was found in Brittany dating from 4,794 BC. And other early monuments (red) were found in northwestern France, the Channel Islands, Catalonia, southwestern France, Corsica and Sardinia from a similar period

The site was thought to have been sentenced to history books in the 1960s when a Spanish general ordered the construction of a hydroelectric dam in Peraleda de la Mata, near Cáceres in Extremadura
Advertisements

The site was thought to have been sentenced to history books in the 1960s when a Spanish general ordered the construction of a hydroelectric dam in Peraleda de la Mata, near Cáceres in Extremadura

The site was thought to have been sentenced to history books in the 1960s when a Spanish general ordered the construction of a hydroelectric dam in Peraleda de la Mata, near Cáceres in Extremadura

Long-term plans for maintaining the site are yet to be drawn up, but Mr Castaño met with regional government officials yesterday to discuss the issue.

If no action is taken now, he said, it may take many years before they are seen again.

Prolonged immersion can also be catastrophic for the stones made of granite, a porous material that is susceptible to erosion,

Advertisements

The monoliths are already showing significant signs of use, he said, and if they are not stored now, it may be too late.

Radiocarbon dating of the rocks showed that they range in age from around 4,000 to 5,000 years old and this links them curiously to the history of Stonehenge.

Neolithic people, often inclined to build monolithic structures, emerged throughout Europe over time.

It is generally accepted that the stones from Stonehenge were extracted from Priesli Hills in Wales and moved to the current location, but how the idea for Stonehenge arrived on the British coast remains a mystery.

Several pieces of recent research have looked at what probably led to this, and a scientific article published in February suggested that the knowledge and expertise to create such monuments had been spread by sailors throughout Europe.

Advertisements

The authors of the University of Gothenburg said that the practice of building huge stone structures began 6,500 years ago in France and then found its way into Europe as people migrated.

Further research into the Spanish Stonehenge & # 39; could provide a more detailed picture of the popularity of practices in different areas at different times.

It is currently believed that residents of Anatolia, now Turkey, have moved to Iberia and settled before finally moving north and entering the British Isles.

WHO HAS BUILT STONE?

Stonehenge was built thousands of years before machines were invented.

The heavy rocks each weigh more than a few tons.

Some stones are believed to have come from a quarry in Wales, about 225 miles from the Wiltshire monument.

To do this, a high degree of ingenuity would be required, and experts believe the old engineers used a pulley system over a shifting conveyor belt of stems.

Historians now think that the stone ring was built in different stages, with the first completed around 5000 years ago by Neolithic Britons using primitive tools made possible from deer antlers.

Modern scientists everywhere now believe that Stonehenge has been created by different tribes over time.

After the Neolithic British – probably natives of the British Isles – started building, it was continued centuries later by their descendants.

Advertisements

Over time, the offspring developed a more common way of life and better tools to help raise the stones.

Bones, tools and other artifacts on the site seem to support this hypothesis.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) Spain