& # 39; Quite a macabre look & # 39 ;: more than 1000 human TEETH are mysteriously found at a demolition site

& # 39; Quite a macabre look & # 39 ;: more than 1000 human TEETH are mysteriously found at a demolition site

  • More than 1,000 human teeth were found during demolition work in New Zealand
  • Find was made in May of this year by a construction worker on the Invercargill site
  • Professional archaeologists said the find & # 39; very unusual & # 39; and & # 39; macabre & # 39; used to be
Advertisements

More than 1000 individual human teeth have been found at a demolition site where a new hotel is being built in New Zealand.

The grim discovery was made by a demolition worker who noticed the teeth after removing some soil with an industrial excavator on 27 May.

Consultant archaeologist Amy McStay was called in to assess the find at the construction site in Invercargill, south of Dunedin, stuff reported.

More than 1000 individual human teeth have been found at a demolition site in New Zealand

Advertisements

More than 1000 individual human teeth have been found at a demolition site in New Zealand

Archaeologist advisors are required on site to ensure that all historical objects can be salvaged before the demolition or construction can continue.

Senior archaeologist Heritage New Zealand Matthew Schmidt told Stuff that the teeth were owned by a dentist who had run his company on the site in the 1950s and 1960s.

& # 39; It was a very unusual find, & # 39; said Dr. Schmidt.

& # 39; I've never encountered it before, a whole bunch of teeth. & # 39;

Invercargill Licensing Trust chief executive Chris Ramsay echoed Dr's views. Schmidt.

& # 39; Teeth as far as you can see … quite a macabre look, & # 39; he said.

Advertisements

Dr. Schmidt said it was not uncommon to find artifacts from old businesses and houses on construction sites.

Because the teeth came from the mid-20th century, the work on the site was quickly put back into use.

Artifacts from before 1900 require that the site be shut down until experts have given the work to continue working.

Heritage New Zealand senior archaeologist Dr. Matthew Schmidt told Stuff that the teeth were owned by a dentist who had run his company on the site in the 1950s and 1960s

Heritage New Zealand senior archaeologist Dr. Matthew Schmidt told Stuff that the teeth were owned by a dentist who had run his company on the site in the 1950s and 1960s

Heritage New Zealand senior archaeologist Dr. Matthew Schmidt told Stuff that the teeth were owned by a dentist who had run his company on the site in the 1950s and 1960s

Advertisements

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail

- Advertisement -