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Jen Ross-King & # 39; s daughter Alex (pictured together), 19, died after consuming three MDMA caps and various alcoholic beverages at the FOMO festival in Parramatta, Sydney in January
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The mother of a teenager who died of a drug overdose at a festival said in tears that she & # 39; lost everything & # 39; while campaigning for testing pills.

Jen Ross-King & # 39; s daughter Alex, 19, died after consuming three MDMA caps and various alcoholic beverages at the FOMO festival in Parramatta, Sydney in January.

The destroyed mother visited the Splendor In The Grass festival at Byron Bay at the weekend to see a demonstration of pill tests.

Jen Ross-King & # 39; s daughter Alex (pictured together), 19, died after consuming three MDMA caps and various alcoholic beverages at the FOMO festival in Parramatta, Sydney in January

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Jen Ross-King & # 39; s daughter Alex (pictured together), 19, died after consuming three MDMA caps and various alcoholic beverages at the FOMO festival in Parramatta, Sydney in January

Against the ABC's 7.30 report that was broadcast on Monday evening, she hurled politicians for not supporting the idea.

& # 39; Change is not easy, but change is necessary … politicians are collectively outdated, & # 39; she said.

Mrs. Ross-King did well when she said she had lost her only child.

& # 39; I can't lose anymore, & # 39; she said. & # 39; I have lost everything. I have lost my only child and I have nothing else to lose. & # 39;

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She is now on a mission to ensure that young people no longer die at festivals.

& # 39; This is not about me, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; This is not about my upbringing, no matter how good or bad you think it has been, no matter how stupid or smart or intelligent or stupid or whatever you want to say, it doesn't matter, OK.

& # 39; This is about your children. Not mine.

Alex Ross-King with her mother Jen (left) and her mother's partner. The teenager died of a drug overdose

Alex Ross-King with her mother Jen (left) and her mother's partner. The teenager died of a drug overdose

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Alex Ross-King with her mother Jen (left) and her mother's partner. The teenager died of a drug overdose

Mrs. Ross-King said her daughter (photo) would have used pill testing and that this might have saved her life

Mrs. Ross-King said her daughter (photo) would have used pill testing and that this might have saved her life

Mrs. Ross-King said her daughter (photo) would have used pill testing and that this might have saved her life

& # 39; I can't change what happened to Alex, but I'm sure for God's sake it can try to change it for someone else.

& # 39; It must stop. It ends. Alex. That is it. It now ends with Alex. & # 39;

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Mrs. Ross-King said that her daughter would have used pill tests and that this might have saved her life.

& # 39; She knew that information was power, & # 39; she said.

Pill testing works well in the UK and throughout Europe, but many Australian politicians fear it would encourage people to use drugs.

Federal Liberal MP Andrew Laming is one of those who oppose the idea.

& # 39; A large part of Australia will be shocked that the state will intervene and test pills in a place like a music festival that should ultimately be drug-free & # 39 ;, he told 7.30.

Alex Ross-King (photo), 19, died after consuming three MDMA caps and multiple alcoholic beverages at the FOMO festival in Parramatta, the western suburbs of Sydney, in January
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Alex Ross-King (photo), 19, died after consuming three MDMA caps and multiple alcoholic beverages at the FOMO festival in Parramatta, the western suburbs of Sydney, in January

Alex Ross-King (photo), 19, died after consuming three MDMA caps and multiple alcoholic beverages at the FOMO festival in Parramatta, the western suburbs of Sydney, in January

Teenage mother Jennie (photo) traveled this weekend to Splendor, a three-day festival in Byron Bay, with NSW vice-state Coroner Harriet Grahame

Teenage mother Jennie (photo) traveled this weekend to Splendor, a three-day festival in Byron Bay, with NSW vice-state Coroner Harriet Grahame

Teenage mother Jennie (photo) traveled this weekend to Splendor, a three-day festival in Byron Bay, with NSW vice-state Coroner Harriet Grahame

On Saturday, Ross-King watched a demonstration of pill tests and said it should be implemented immediately.

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& # 39; I think the disappointing part is that this has been in the making for 20 years & # 39 ;, she told reporters afterwards.

& # 39; That's why I feel like I need to help promote that change because someone else is going to give birth and I don't want their child to be in the same position as Alex and our family in 20 years.

& # 39; Enough is enough. You know, like … enough. Now it's just a joke. & # 39;

NSW does not currently allow testing of illegal drugs at music festivals, so the doctor who did the demonstration, Dr. Caldicott demonstrated the use of legal means.

Magistrate Harriet Grahame (second front row), who oversees the festivals involved, and Mrs. Ross-King (third back row from the left) attend a pilot test demonstration on Saturday

Magistrate Harriet Grahame (second front row), who oversees the festivals involved, and Mrs. Ross-King (third back row from the left) attend a pilot test demonstration on Saturday

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Magistrate Harriet Grahame (second front row), who oversees the festivals involved, and Mrs. Ross-King (third back row from the left) attend a pilot test demonstration on Saturday

Mrs. Ross-King told reporters & # 39; enough is enough & # 39; and insisted on the execution of pill tests. Pictured: Mrs. Ross-King & # 39; s daughter Alex

Mrs. Ross-King told reporters & # 39; enough is enough & # 39; and insisted on the execution of pill tests. Pictured: Mrs. Ross-King & # 39; s daughter Alex

Mrs. Ross-King told reporters & # 39; enough is enough & # 39; and insisted on the execution of pill tests. Pictured: Mrs. Ross-King & # 39; s daughter Alex

Ms. Grahame tours the festival while overseeing the investigation of six recent drug-related deaths at NSW music festivals.

Ross-King, Nathan Tran, Joshua Tam, Joseph Pham, Callum Brosnan and Diana Nguyen were all between 18 and 23 years old.

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The investigation, which will be resumed in September, has been told that drug control would provide an opportunity for young people to get advice on their use of illegal drugs and warn of the damage.

Various methods have been proposed, including spot-test kits at music festivals and the establishment of a permanent laboratory in an urban center that anyone can check anonymously.

"I think the disappointing part is that this is 20 years in the making," Ross-King told reporters after the demonstration

For now, with drug possession and delivery banned, the police have warned those at Splendor to be aware of the consequences of risky behavior.

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The police warn festival-goers to be cautious during the weekend and urge them to seek medical help if they feel unwell.

& # 39; Prohibited drugs are illegal and potentially life-threatening, especially in combination with alcohol, so I urge everyone to act responsibly & quot; said inspector Dave Roptell in a statement.

& # 39; Anyone who is under the influence or feels unwell is called upon to seek professional medical help. & # 39;

Emergency medicine specialist David Caldicott demonstrates a pill test machine on legal substances (photo)

Emergency medicine specialist David Caldicott demonstrates a pill test machine on legal substances (photo)

Emergency medicine specialist David Caldicott demonstrates a pill test machine on legal substances (photo)

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