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Michelle Obama (right) was accompanied by her brother, Craig Robinson (left), while she spoke at the Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago on Tuesday about the sadness of losing her father, Fraser Robinson, to multiple sclerosis at the age of 55 in 1991

Former First Lady Michelle Obama shared her grief that her deceased father was not allowed to walk her down the aisle after he died the year before her marriage to Barack.

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At the Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago on Tuesday, Ms. Obama took the stage with her older brother Craig Robinson, and the siblings described the loss of their & # 39; patriarchal & # 39; father as & # 39; traumatic & # 39 ;.

The 55-year-old told host Isabel Wilkerson that marrying Barack Obama on October 3, 1992 & # 39; bittersweet & # 39; Has been.

When asked if it is a & # 39; beautiful day & # 39; , Mrs. Obama signed and said: & # 39; Yes … it was a tough day & # 39; and added: & # 39; My father was not there to walk me down the aisle. He had just died. It was bittersweet and I married the man I loved – you know that guy Barack Obama – but Daddy died … & # 39;

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Michelle Obama (right) was accompanied by her brother, Craig Robinson (left), while she spoke at the Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago on Tuesday about the sadness of losing her father, Fraser Robinson, to multiple sclerosis at the age of 55 in 1991

Michelle Obama (right) was accompanied by her brother, Craig Robinson (left), while she spoke at the Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago on Tuesday about the sadness of losing her father, Fraser Robinson, to multiple sclerosis at the age of 55 in 1991

Michelle Obama described their father as a & # 39; patriarch & # 39; where relatives would go for comfort and comfort and said her marriage to Barack Obama in October 1992 & # 39; bittersweet & # 39; and & # 39; hard & # 39; was without her father to walk her down the aisle (Photo: Michelle Obama (right) sits on the lap of her mother Marian Robinson, while her father Fraser holds her brother Craig. The family moved to the south side of Chicago in the 70s )
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Michelle Obama described their father as a & # 39; patriarch & # 39; where relatives would go for comfort and comfort and said her marriage to Barack Obama in October 1992 & # 39; bittersweet & # 39; and & # 39; hard & # 39; was without her father to walk her down the aisle (Photo: Michelle Obama (right) sits on the lap of her mother Marian Robinson, while her father Fraser holds her brother Craig. The family moved to the south side of Chicago in the 70s )

Michelle Obama described their father as a & # 39; patriarch & # 39; where relatives would go for comfort and comfort and said her marriage to Barack Obama in October 1992 & # 39; bittersweet & # 39; and & # 39; hard & # 39; was without her father to walk her down the aisle (Photo: Michelle Obama (right) sits on the lap of her mother Marian Robinson, while her father Fraser holds her brother Craig. The family moved to the south side of Chicago in the 70s )

Michelle and Barack Obama pictured on their wedding day on October 3, 1992. Michelle said about her marriage: & I married the man I loved - you know that guy Barack Obama - but Daddy died ... & # 39 ;

Michelle and Barack Obama pictured on their wedding day on October 3, 1992. Michelle said about her marriage: & I married the man I loved - you know that guy Barack Obama - but Daddy died ... & # 39 ;

Michelle and Barack Obama pictured on their wedding day on October 3, 1992. Michelle said about her marriage: & I married the man I loved – you know that guy Barack Obama – but Daddy died … & # 39 ;

Mrs. Obama then walked away and asked brother Craig when exactly their father had died, and admitted that she had blocked & # 39; the actual day & # 39 ;.

Fraser Robinson died in 1991 at the age of 55 after a long fight with multiple sclerosis.

Her brother, a basketball coach and broadcaster, explained the family's unrest: & # 39; It was so traumatic when our father died. This guy was the embodiment of fathers in our mind.

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He added: & # 39; He was a kind of patriarch. People went to him for advice and jokes and comfort and comfort and all the things that you go to a family patriarch for. & # 39;

Regarding the sadness of the brothers and sisters in the months following the death of their father, Fraser, Robin said: “It was so hard for people to look at the sadness in me or my sister and their faces would look sad how sad we were. He had given us so much that it helped us to be where we were and where we are now. & # 39;

Michelle added that she took comfort in the fact that her father and her future husband get to know each other and say: "Thank goodness he met Barack Obama and gave Barack Obama his blessing."

Blessing: Michelle said she was comforted that her father Fraser Barack gave his blessing to marry his daughter before his death. The couple organized the Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago because here the & # 39; Obama Presidential Center & # 39; will be built

Blessing: Michelle said she was comforted that her father Fraser Barack gave his blessing to marry his daughter before his death. The couple organized the Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago because here the & # 39; Obama Presidential Center & # 39; will be built

Blessing: Michelle said she was comforted that her father Fraser Barack gave his blessing to marry his daughter before his death. The couple organized the Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago because here the & # 39; Obama Presidential Center & # 39; will be built

Craig Robinson, 57, told the public about their father's loss and said, "It was so hard for people to look at the sadness in me or my sister and their faces would be sad to see how sad we were" # 39; (Photo: Michelle Obama and Craig Robinson at the Obama Foundation Summit)
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Craig Robinson, 57, told the public about their father's loss and said, "It was so hard for people to look at the sadness in me or my sister and their faces would be sad to see how sad we were" # 39; (Photo: Michelle Obama and Craig Robinson at the Obama Foundation Summit)

Craig Robinson, 57, told the public about their father's loss and said, "It was so hard for people to look at the sadness in me or my sister and their faces would be sad to see how sad we were" # 39; (Photo: Michelle Obama and Craig Robinson at the Obama Foundation Summit)

During the speech, she also described what life was like for her family – and other black families – when they moved to the South Side of Chicago in the 1970s, saying it was her first experience with & # 39; white flight & # 39 ;

The former first lady spoke Tuesday about her youth and her life's work at the Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago. She has compared her experience with what immigrant families in America now come across every day.

She said she wanted to remind whites that they were running away from & # 39; us & # 39; and that they are still running. She added that & # 39; artificial things & # 39; such as the color of a person's skin and the texture of their hair can divide countries.

Robinson said that the siblings of father & # 39; have given us so much that it has helped us where we were and where we are now & # 39;
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Robinson said that the siblings of father & # 39; have given us so much that it has helped us where we were and where we are now & # 39;

Robinson said that the siblings of father & # 39; have given us so much that it has helped us where we were and where we are now & # 39;

& # 39; As families like ours – Founded families like ours who did everything we needed to do and better. When we moved, white people moved because they were afraid of what our families represented, & she said.

& # 39; I always stop there when I talk about it in the world because I want to remind white people that you were running away from us. This family. This family with all the values ​​you read about, you fled from us. & # 39;

The 55-year-old added that her family was no different than immigrant families who made a home for themselves in the US – and in particular she referred to the Pilsen area in Chicago, where a large number of Mexican immigrants settled.

Former First lady Michelle Obama has talked about racism in America, comparing her experience of moving to a white neighborhood in Chicago with the same experience immigrants are now experiencing - all whites are leaving
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Former First lady Michelle Obama has talked about racism in America, comparing her experience of moving to a white neighborhood in Chicago with the same experience immigrants are now experiencing - all whites are leaving

Former First lady Michelle Obama has talked about racism in America, comparing her experience of moving to a white neighborhood in Chicago with the same experience immigrants are now experiencing – all whites are leaving

The Obamas in front of the White House during President Barack Obama's second tenure. Michelle Obama said: & # 39; As the first black first family, America and the world have had the chance to see the truth about who we are as black people & # 39;

The Obamas in front of the White House during President Barack Obama's second tenure. Michelle Obama said: & # 39; As the first black first family, America and the world have had the chance to see the truth about who we are as black people & # 39;

The Obamas in front of the White House during President Barack Obama's second tenure. Michelle Obama said: & # 39; As the first black first family, America and the world have had the chance to see the truth about who we are as black people & # 39;

The 55-year-old explained that because of this experience she had always felt a sense of injustice. Not only because of racism, but also because the families & # 39; divested & # 39; in their community.

& # 39; We were part of creating … history, and many people walked away from it, divested. One by one, they packed their bags and they ran away from us and left communities in ruins, & she said.

& # 39; There were no gang battles, there were no territorial battles but one by one they packed their bags and they ran away from us. & # 39;

Michelle and Craig, pictured together as children, grew up on the city's South Side with friends of all races, but the former first lady said it became clear that white people from their neighborhood were starting to move when they moved

Michelle and Craig, pictured together as children, grew up on the city's South Side with friends of all races, but the former first lady said it became clear that white people from their neighborhood were starting to move when they moved

Michelle and Craig, pictured together as children, grew up on the city's South Side with friends of all races, but the former first lady said it became clear that white people from their neighborhood were starting to move when they moved

She explained that this was despite the fact that the neighborhood at the time was multicultural and that children of all races in the neighborhood were friends.

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& # 39; You know when people run away from you, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; I can't scare people to black people. I don't know what's going on, I can't explain what's going on in your head – but maybe if I show up every day as a human being, a good human being, maybe that work takes the scrubs of your discrimination away. & # 39;

Former President Barack Obama kisses former First Lady Michelle Obama on the cheek as they appear on stage together after the Obama Foundation Summit

Former President Barack Obama kisses former First Lady Michelle Obama on the cheek as they appear on stage together after the Obama Foundation Summit

Former President Barack Obama kisses former First Lady Michelle Obama on the cheek as they appear on stage together after the Obama Foundation Summit

Michelle Obama said her parents gave her and her brother & # 39; unconditional love and the idea that our votes mattered & # 39 ;. She is pictured here with Barack Obama

Michelle Obama said her parents gave her and her brother & # 39; unconditional love and the idea that our votes mattered & # 39 ;. She is pictured here with Barack Obama

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Michelle Obama said her parents gave her and her brother & # 39; unconditional love and the idea that our votes mattered & # 39 ;. She is pictured here with Barack Obama

Michelle Obama – who was accompanied on stage by students and community activists at the Illinois Institute of Technology by her brother Craig Robinson – said their parents had taught them a number of beliefs that helped counter the discrimination they felt.

& # 39; What our parents gave us was unconditional love and the idea that our voices mattered and our opinions mattered, and what we said and thought meant meaning & she said.

And she added that when husband Barack Obama was first elected president, and the family moved to the White House, it allowed people beyond those & # 39; artificial things & # 39; to watch.

& # 39; As the first black first family, America and the world have had the chance to see the truth about who we are as black people, & # 39; she said.

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She added that & # 39; you don't have to worry about the inheritance while you are in it. Let your truth speak for itself & # 39 ;.

Barack and Michelle Obama & # 39; s long history with Chicago extends to their children, Sasha and Malia, who are born there

Barack and Michelle Obama & # 39; s long history with Chicago extends to their children, Sasha and Malia, who are born there

Barack and Michelle Obama & # 39; s long history with Chicago extends to their children, Sasha and Malia, who are born there

Michelle and Barack Obama both spoke at the Illinois Institute of Technology, where their three-day summit will be held with lectures by activists, including Ava DuVernay and singer Mavis Staples.

The summit is held in the city while the couple outlines their vision of the Obama Presidential Center.

The center is planned along the South Side waterfront in Chicago. It's close to where Obama started his political career and lived with his family.

The $ 500 million center is expected to house a public library location, host multimedia collections, and include community programs.

President Obama, 58, who opened the summit at a dinner on Monday, said the South Side was the right place for the couple's post-White House foundation and the final presidential library.

& # 39; It was normal for Michelle and I to say: & # 39; Well, we should do it at this place & # 39 ;, where I became a man and where Michelle grew up and where our children were born, & # 39; he said.

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