& # 39; Barefoot Bandit & # 39 ;, 28, the request to end his probationary period is denied, so that he can become a public speaker

Colton Harris-Moore, 28, was denied by a federal judge when he wanted to prematurely end his probationary period. He is seen in an undated file photo

Colton Harris-Moore, 28, was denied by a federal judge when he wanted to prematurely end his probationary period. He is seen in an undated file photo

The man who became notoriously known as the & # 39; Barefoot Bandit & # 39; for a massive two-year crime, he will not be able to prematurely end his probationary period, so that he can earn money abroad as a motivational speaker.

Colton Harris-Moore, 28, is currently released under surveillance after serving a prison sentence for 67 state and federal crimes, including theft of cars, speedboats and airplanes.

A federal judge in Seattle denied on Friday that Harris-Moore's request to be released under supervision so that he could earn at least $ 10,000 per speech in countries such as France, China, and South Korea.

Harris-Moore claimed in his court last month that he was a changed man and that the controlled release prevented him from pursuing lucrative opportunities, according to The Seattle Times.

He will finish his upcoming September.

His lawyer, Colleen Hartl, argued before the court that ongoing probation would be a waste of court resources.

She also claimed that Harris-Moore was told by his probation officer that he was treated differently from others because of his fame.

Harris-Moore (seen in the back right with his lawyer, John Henry Browne, in December 2011) must end his three-year federal probationary period in September.

Harris-Moore (seen in the back right with his lawyer, John Henry Browne, in December 2011) must end his three-year federal probationary period in September.

Harris-Moore (seen in the back right with his lawyer, John Henry Browne, in December 2011) must end his three-year federal probationary period in September.

Harris-Moore became known as the & # 39; Barefoot Bandit & # 39; for committing a series of burglaries and thefts and leaving chalk drawings of his bare feet (as shown above at a market in Orcas Island, Washington after it was broken into in February 2010)

Harris-Moore became known as the & # 39; Barefoot Bandit & # 39; for committing a series of burglaries and thefts and leaving chalk drawings of his bare feet (as shown above at a market in Orcas Island, Washington after it was broken into in February 2010)

Harris-Moore became known as the & # 39; Barefoot Bandit & # 39; for committing a series of burglaries and thefts and leaving chalk drawings of his bare feet (as shown above at a market in Orcas Island, Washington after it was broken into in February 2010)

Hartl told the court that Harris-Moore is trying to go beyond the barefoot character & # 39 ;.

& # 39; The & # 39; Barefoot Bandit & # 39; has not been his identity or reality for more than 10 years.

& # 39; The & # 39; Barefoot Bandit & # 39; is gone, & # 39; wrote Hartl.

& # 39; If the purpose of the probation service is to reintegrate the perpetrator into society as a productive, law-abiding citizen, that is done.

& # 39; Probation has nothing to offer anymore. & # 39;

Hartl complained in her court case last month that it took months for the probation officer to process and eventually deny a request from Harris-Moore to move to Arizona last year.

But federal prosecutors refuted the claims of Harris-Moore's lawyer.

Harris-Moore (seen in this undated file photo) says that his probationary period limits his chances of making money as a motivational speaker

Harris-Moore (seen in this undated file photo) says that his probationary period limits his chances of making money as a motivational speaker

Harris-Moore (seen in this undated file photo) says that his probationary period limits his chances of making money as a motivational speaker

They said that Harris-Moore was denied a chance to move to Arizona because he had no ties with the state and had never been visited.

Michael Dion, the American lawyer assistant, said Harris-Moore was the beneficiary of his fame.

He noted that Harris-Moore received more than $ 1 million for the rights to his life story – most of which was used to pay the approximately $ 1.3 million that he was ordered to repay for his victims.

In 2011, the 20th Century Fox film studio acquired the rights to the life story of Harris-Moore.

According to Dion, most convicted criminals would have to work all their lives to pay off that debt.

Harris-Moore claims that he could earn at least $ 10,000 per speech in countries such as China, France, and South Korea

Harris-Moore claims that he could earn at least $ 10,000 per speech in countries such as China, France, and South Korea

Harris-Moore claims that he could earn at least $ 10,000 per speech in countries such as China, France, and South Korea

& # 39; Assuming that people would actually pay Mr. Harris-Moore a $ 20,000 speaking allowance, that is because of his persona, & # 39; Dion said to the court.

& # 39; Other people with supervision have their own compelling stories, full of struggles, hardships, mistakes, successes and hope.

& # 39; But nobody will pay them to speak because they are not the Barefoot Bandit … Mr. Harris-Moore has committed dozens of dangerous and destructive crimes.

& # 39; These also happened to be unusual, interesting crimes that had caught the attention of the press and turned Mr. Harris-Moore into an outlaw hero.

& # 39; He may regret what he has done, but he must not deny that he is still benefiting from that person. & # 39;

Judge Richard A. Jones, district court, denied Harris-Moore's request for claiming that he did not provide evidence that he was indeed given opportunities to work as a motivational speaker.

Jones also said that Harris-Moore had not asked his probation officer to travel to speaking engagements, which should be the first step in the process.

In his statement on Friday, Jones said the & # 39; noble & # 39; is from Harris-Moore to want to pay a refund faster, but the convicted criminal does not understand that another way to serve as an example to others is to make his full sense for the countless blatant crimes he has committed and the damage he caused to the lives of a number of victims. & # 39;

& # 39; After completing his entire sentence and continuing to deliver on his promise to complete everyone, Mr. Harris-Moore can take the nickname "Barefoot Bandit" and instead be known as Colton Harris-Moore , the example for turning his life from challenges to a success story to inspire others, & the judge wrote in his verdict.

In 2012, Harris-Moore was sentenced to six years in prison and three years of probation for supervision.

As a childhood, Harris-Moore was raised by an alcoholic mother and a series of her condemned friends.

Harris-Moore & # 39; s first conviction came at the age of 12, in 2004, for possession of stolen property, and his first burglary experience came when he broke into his classmates' homes to steal food because his mother the majority of her social security income spent on beer and cigarettes – something she has denied.

Over the next three years, he was convicted of theft, burglary, malicious misfortune, and assault, among other crimes.

In 2007, the boy was sentenced to three years in a juvenile detention center after he pleaded guilty for three burglaries in Island County.

But he fled from the minimum-safe facility in April 2008 and soon returned to his old tricks, forcing unoccupied holiday apartments, stealing food and sometimes staying there.

His lawyers say that Harris-Moore his character & # 39; Barefoot Bandit & # 39; wants to blow off and inspire others

His lawyers say that Harris-Moore his character & # 39; Barefoot Bandit & # 39; wants to blow off and inspire others

His lawyers say that Harris-Moore his character & # 39; Barefoot Bandit & # 39; wants to blow off and inspire others

Some of the crimes were committed barefoot, and there he was given the name.

When investigators with a red face repeatedly failed to reach him, his antics escalated: he started stealing aircraft from small, rural airports and crashing them – at least five at least.

Waves of burglary broke out on Orcas Island, where Kyle Ater runs his Homegrown Market and Deli, in late 2009 and early 2010, after stolen aircraft were found at the airport there.

The second time, Harris-Moore left Ater's new security system in a utility sink, under a running tap.

Harris-Moore & # 39; s last attack came after he stole a gun in eastern British Columbia and took a plane from a hangar in Idaho, where investigators found bare footsteps on the floor and wall.

That plane crashed near Granite Falls, Washington, after the fuel ran out.

He made his way to Oregon in a 30-meter boat stolen in southwestern Washington – he was the first to stop and spend $ 100 at an animal shelter in Raymond, Washington.

From Oregon, the authorities said that Harris-Moore was traveling through the United States and regularly stole cars from the parking areas of small airports.

In Indiana he stole another plane and made it to the Bahamas, more than 1,000 miles away, where authorities eventually picked him up in a manhunt that spanned multiple islands.

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