Home US 24-year-old US soldier says Moderna COVID vaccine gave him debilitating heart disease

24-year-old US soldier says Moderna COVID vaccine gave him debilitating heart disease

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She claims she was released from active duty in 2022 while suffering from symptoms, costing her medical benefits and pay.

A former soldier who says she suffered a debilitating heart condition as a result of Moderna’s COVID vaccine has shared explosive documents in which the military links the shots to health conditions.

Army National Guard Specialist Karoline Stancik, 24, told former CBS reporter Catherine Herridge that she did not have any heart conditions before receiving the vaccine under the Department of Defense’s 2021 vaccine mandate.

He has since been diagnosed with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, according to a US Army memorandumthat links the vaccine to the syndrome.

Some 17,000 soldiers repelled the fire, defying the Biden administration’s mandate with the support of many conservatives who agreed with their concerns about the pace at which it occurred.

The military finally revoked the rule in January 2023.

She claims she was released from active duty in 2022 while suffering from symptoms, costing her medical benefits and pay.

Army National Guard Specialist Karoline Stancik, 24, said she suffered a

Army National Guard Specialist Karoline Stancik, 24, said she suffered a “debilitating heart condition” as a result of the COVID vaccine.

In Stancik’s documents, military officials point to a link between a COVID infection or a COVID vaccine with a “debilitating heart condition.”

Doctors have fought against that narrative, insisting that the vaccine only worsened the condition among people who already had pre-existing conditions.

“The only thing I would have changed was the COVID vaccine, and that’s when everything changed for me,” Stancik told Herridge in a sit-down interview published in X.

He said that after receiving the first vaccine, he began experiencing cough, chest pain, sinus pressure and headaches.

But after receiving the second dose a month later, Stancik said his symptoms worsened and he began experiencing rapid heart rate, neuropathic pain and difficulty breathing.

“I felt like a burning sensation all over my body,” he shared, noting that he also felt extreme pain in his chest.

“I felt like a balloon was forming in my chest.”

While suffering from these symptoms, Stancik said she was released from active duty in 2022, costing her medical benefits and salary.

“She was neglected and was not receiving the medical care she needed,” he said.

Stancik claims he then spent three weeks driving across the country trying to get medical care while still suffering.

At times, he said, the effects were so debilitating that he even considered suicide.

Stancik said he has had three heart attacks, a mini-stroke and is now getting a pacemaker.

Stancik said he has had three heart attacks, a mini-stroke and is now getting a pacemaker.

“They wrote her off as trash,” USJAG veterans advocate Jeremy Sorenson told Herridge.

She did not regain her medical benefits until October 2023, when the US military ruled that she had been injured in the line of duty, Herridge reports.

Meanwhile, he said he racked up more than $70,000 in medical debt.

“I’ve had three heart attacks, a mini stroke and now I’m getting a pacemaker,” Stancik said.

But Sorenson said Stancik’s case is not unique and instead represents a broader trend of the Defense Department eliminating benefits for wounded soldiers as a cost-saving measure.

“They have the money,” Sorenson said. ‘They choose to spend money on other things.

“The Department of Defense chooses to spend its money not on its people or wounded service members; it has other priorities.”

Stancik denied that he is trying to spread anti-vaccine propaganda

Stancik denied that he is trying to spread anti-vaccine propaganda

He also suggested that other service members may have suffered adverse reactions to the COVID vaccine.

“DoD leaders did not want to address – and still do not want to address – that we may have harmed our own people” with the vaccine mandate,” he said.

Now, Stancik and Sorenson say they hope their case will help other service members who suffered side effects from the COVID vaccine get the benefits they need.

At the same time, Stancik denies spreading anti-vaccine propaganda and notes: “My story, my health, is mine.”

In a statement to Herridge, a U.S. Army spokesman reportedly said Stancik could have remained on active duty while receiving treatment.

However, Stancik denied receiving advice on that option.

DailyMail.com has contacted Moderna and the US military for comment.

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