200,000 people buy tickets to see the new Da Vnici exhibition

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Nearly 200,000 people have already reserved their place for a new Leonardo Da Vinci exhibition at the Louvre, which opens on Thursday, although two of the works of the master painter will be missing.

Both the Mona Lisa and the Salvator Mundi will be absent from the exhibition 500 years after the death of the Renaissance master.

A decade in the planning, the show simply titled & # 39; Leonardo da Vinci & # 39; groups 162 works, including 24 drawings borrowed by Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain from the Royal Collection.

The British Museum, the Hermitage of St Petersburg and the Vatican also contributed, as well as, of course, Italy – after a sometimes bitter tug-of-war between Rome and Paris on the loans.

A visitor takes a picture of the painting & # 39; Saint Anne, The and Jesus Child with a Lamb & # 39; by the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo Da Vinci during an exhibition at the Louvre in Paris, October 22, 2019

A visitor takes a picture of the painting & # 39; Saint Anne, The and Jesus Child with a Lamb & # 39; by the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo Da Vinci during an exhibition at the Louvre in Paris, October 22, 2019

A visitor looks at a portrait of the Italian artist Leonardo Da Vinci by Francesco Melzi, shown in an exhibition at the Louvre

A visitor looks at a portrait of the Italian artist Leonardo Da Vinci by Francesco Melzi, shown in an exhibition at the Louvre

A visitor looks at a portrait of the Italian artist Leonardo Da Vinci by Francesco Melzi, shown in an exhibition at the Louvre

Visitors look at the painting & # 39; The Virgin with a Child and St. John the Baptist & # 39; from Da Vinci

Visitors look at the painting & # 39; The Virgin with a Child and St. John the Baptist & # 39; from Da Vinci

Visitors look at the painting & # 39; The Virgin with a Child and St. John the Baptist & # 39; from Da Vinci

The organizers decided that & # 39; the world's most famous painting should remain in the Salle des Etats of the Louvre – its normal home base – to prevent overcrowding.

As it is, the masterpiece attracts nearly 30,000 people a day.

However, the unspeakable smile of the Mona Lisa will deceive visitors into a virtual reality experience at the end of the Leonardo show, which runs until 24 February.

An exterior view of the Louvre in Paris, France, while it is preparing to welcome 220,000 guests this Thursday

An exterior view of the Louvre in Paris, France, while it is preparing to welcome 220,000 guests this Thursday

An exterior view of the Louvre in Paris, France, while it is preparing to welcome 220,000 guests this Thursday

The drawing book of the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo Da Vinci is exhibited during an exhibition at the Louvre

The drawing book of the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo Da Vinci is exhibited during an exhibition at the Louvre

The drawing book of the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo Da Vinci is exhibited during an exhibition at the Louvre

Vincent Delieuvin, French chief curator of the 16th-century Italian paintings of the Louvre, speaks to media for the painting entitled & # 39; Portrait of an Unknown Woman, Also Known as La Belle Ferronniere & # 39;

Vincent Delieuvin, French chief curator of the 16th-century Italian paintings of the Louvre, speaks to media for the painting entitled & # 39; Portrait of an Unknown Woman, Also Known as La Belle Ferronniere & # 39;

Vincent Delieuvin, French chief curator of the 16th-century Italian paintings of the Louvre, speaks to media for the painting entitled & # 39; Portrait of an Unknown Woman, Also Known as La Belle Ferronniere & # 39;

The other notable no-show is the Salvator Mundi, the work that became the most expensive painting ever sold when it reached £ 347,000 at a Christie's auction in 2017.

Mystery now surrounds the painting – the authenticity of which is disputed by some experts – because it has not been seen in public since the stunning sale.

It would be officially shown at the Louvre Abu Dhabi, but a disclosure set for September 2018 was inexplicably postponed.

The Louvre said that the museum's request to borrow the work is still being processed.

The exhibition in the Napoleon hall shows 11 of the 20 paintings that have been definitively attributed to the Renaissance master, as well as drawings, manuscripts, sculptures and other art objects.

A detailed view of the drawing entitled & # 39; The study of the Virgin with the child & # 39 ;. The organizers decided that & # 39; the world's most famous painting, the Mona Lisa, should remain in the Salle des Etats of the Louvre - its normal home base - to help prevent overcrowding.

A detailed view of the drawing entitled & # 39; The study of the Virgin with the child & # 39 ;. The organizers decided that & # 39; the world's most famous painting, the Mona Lisa, should remain in the Salle des Etats of the Louvre - its normal home base - to help prevent overcrowding.

A detailed view of the drawing entitled & # 39; The study of the Virgin with the child & # 39 ;. The organizers decided that & # 39; the world's most famous painting, the Mona Lisa, should remain in the Salle des Etats of the Louvre – its normal home base – to help prevent overcrowding.

A representation of a painting entitled & # 39; Leda & # 39 ;. The show guides the visitor through the timeline of the master's peripatetic life

A representation of a painting entitled & # 39; Leda & # 39 ;. The show guides the visitor through the timeline of the master's peripatetic life

A representation of a painting entitled & # 39; Leda & # 39 ;. The show guides the visitor through the timeline of the master's peripatetic life

A visitor looks at an infrared reflectography of the painting & # 39; Mona Lisa & # 39 ;. & # 39; The world's most famous painting is just one corridor away from the exhibition because they decided it would be best to keep it in the same place where it attracts 30,000 guests every day

A visitor looks at an infrared reflectography of the painting & # 39; Mona Lisa & # 39 ;. & # 39; The world's most famous painting is just one corridor away from the exhibition because they decided it would be best to keep it in the same place where it attracts 30,000 guests every day

A visitor looks at an infrared reflectography of the painting & # 39; Mona Lisa & # 39 ;. & # 39; The world's most famous painting is just one corridor away from the exhibition because they decided it would be best to keep it in the same place where it attracts 30,000 guests every day

The show leads the visitor through the timeline of the master's peripatic life under the supervision of dukes, princes and kings, from Florence to Milan, Venice and Rome, and finally France, where he spent the last three years of his life.

The last act in line between Paris and Rome about Italy's contributions to the show came with a last-minute legal effort to stop the loan of the iconic Vitruvian Man drawing.

Last week an Italian court rejected an offer from an association that advocated the protection of Italian heritage – Italia Nostra (Our Italy) – to stop the loan of the work from the late 15th century, arguing that it was too fragile was to travel.

People take photos of the drawing entitled & # 39; The Vitruve Man & # 39; - The last act in line between Paris and Rome about Italy's contributions to the show came with a last-minute legal effort to stop the loan of the iconic Vitruvian Man drawing

People take photos of the drawing entitled & # 39; The Vitruve Man & # 39; - The last act in line between Paris and Rome about Italy's contributions to the show came with a last-minute legal effort to stop the loan of the iconic Vitruvian Man drawing

People take photos of the drawing entitled & # 39; The Vitruve Man & # 39; – The last act in line between Paris and Rome about Italy's contributions to the show came with a last-minute legal effort to stop the loan of the iconic Vitruvian Man drawing

A visitor takes a picture of the painting & # 39; The Virgin with a Child and St. John the Baptist & # 39; by the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo Da Vinci during an exhibition at the Louvre in Paris, France

A visitor takes a picture of the painting & # 39; The Virgin with a Child and St. John the Baptist & # 39; by the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo Da Vinci during an exhibition at the Louvre in Paris, France

A visitor takes a picture of the painting & # 39; The Virgin with a Child and St. John the Baptist & # 39; by the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo Da Vinci during an exhibition at the Louvre in Paris, France

A visitor looks at the painting entitled & # 39; Portrait of a young man with a music sheet, also known as The Musician & # 39;

A visitor looks at the painting entitled & # 39; Portrait of a young man with a music sheet, also known as The Musician & # 39;

A visitor looks at the painting entitled & # 39; Portrait of a young man with a music sheet, also known as The Musician & # 39;

An outburst of Italy's contributions to the Louvre show broke out at the end of last year when the new populist rulers in Rome agreed with the previous government's agreement with Paris.

Lucia Borgonzoni, number two in the Italian Ministry of Culture and member of the anti-immigration League party, argued that the agreement was skewed in favor of France.

At the height of the queue, it seemed that Italy would cancel the deal altogether. It was finally resolved with the Paris commitment to lend several hundred-year-old Rafaels to Rome next year's death.

The culture & # 39; Saint Thomas and the Christ & # 39; by the Italian Renaissance artist Andrea del Verrochio is shown during the exhibition

The culture & # 39; Saint Thomas and the Christ & # 39; by the Italian Renaissance artist Andrea del Verrochio is shown during the exhibition

The culture & # 39; Saint Thomas and the Christ & # 39; by the Italian Renaissance artist Andrea del Verrochio is shown during the exhibition

0 A visitor looks at the painting entitled & # 39; Portrait of an Unknown Woman, also known as La Belle Ferronniere & # 39;

0 A visitor looks at the painting entitled & # 39; Portrait of an Unknown Woman, also known as La Belle Ferronniere & # 39;

0 A visitor looks at the painting entitled & # 39; Portrait of an Unknown Woman, also known as La Belle Ferronniere & # 39;

The painting La Gioconda (Mona Lisa) by Leonardo da Vinci is in the new renovated room of the Louvre in Paris, France

The painting La Gioconda (Mona Lisa) by Leonardo da Vinci is in the new renovated room of the Louvre in Paris, France

The painting La Gioconda (Mona Lisa) by Leonardo da Vinci is in the new renovated room of the Louvre in Paris, France

The Vitruvian man – of whom Italian media say he is insured for at least a billion euros – will participate in the Louvre show later this month, but only for a few weeks instead of the full four months.

The drawing, kept in a climate-controlled safe in the Accademia gallery in Venice, is rarely shown to the public.

The exhibition compiled by Vincent Delieuvin and Louis Frank of the Louvre, the heads of the painting and graphic arts departments of the museum, includes infrared reflectographers who provide insight into the techniques of the master painter.

Journalists film Leonardo da Vinci's painting La Gioconda (Mona Lisa) in the newly renovated room of the Louvre Museum

Journalists film Leonardo da Vinci's painting La Gioconda (Mona Lisa) in the newly renovated room of the Louvre Museum

Journalists film Leonardo da Vinci's painting La Gioconda (Mona Lisa) in the newly renovated room of the Louvre Museum

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