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14th-century Native American ‘lodge of sweat’ discovered in Mexico City

The ‘sauna’ of the Native Americans used by the Aztecs to ‘purify their bodies’ before childbirth, spiritual rituals and medical treatment 600 years ago is discovered in Mexico City

  • The so-called sweat cabin is known as ‘temazcal’ in pre-Hispanic culture.
  • He was unearthed in an archeological site in the center of Mexico City.
  • The temazcales were used to purify the body and also worship female deities.

A Native American sauna was discovered in Mexico City dating from the fourteenth century.

The so-called ‘sweat shelter’ was found in an archeological site in the La Merced neighborhood in Mexico City.

It is believed that the room was used to purify the body of the locals in various circumstances, including for medicinal purposes, religious rituals and births.

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Photo: the temazcal found in Mexico City. Archaeologists discovered this pre-Hispanic cabin used in religious ceremonies in Mexico City

Photo: the temazcal found in Mexico City. Archaeologists discovered this pre-Hispanic cabin used in religious ceremonies in Mexico City

The so-called sweat shelter (pictured) was found at an archeological site in the La Merced neighborhood in Mexico City

The so-called sweat shelter (pictured) was found at an archeological site in the La Merced neighborhood in Mexico City

The so-called sweat shelter (pictured) was found at an archeological site in the La Merced neighborhood in Mexico City

It is believed that the Aztecs used the room to purify the body in various circumstances, including for medicinal purposes, religious rituals and for childbirth.

It is believed that the Aztecs used the room to purify the body in various circumstances, including for medicinal purposes, religious rituals and for childbirth.

It is believed that the Aztecs used the room to purify the body in various circumstances, including for medicinal purposes, religious rituals and for childbirth.

According to the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico (INAH), the sweat lodge, known as ‘temazcal’ in pre-Hispanic culture, was part of the noble neighborhood of Temazcaltitlán, in the Teopan area of ​​the state of Tenochtitlán.

A sweat cabin is a low profile cabin where a purification ceremony was held that aimed to clean a person by inducing perspiration.

The foundations of a colonial house and a tannery inhabited by people of the Mexican nobility between 1521 and 1620 AD were also found at the excavation site. C.

“The findings suggest that in the 16th century this area was more populated than we initially thought,” said Victor Esperón Calleja, who led the excavation work, the BBC reports.

The temazcales were used to purify the body after the effort, such as after a battle, and also to heal the sick, improve health and help in childbirth.

The foundations of a colonial house and a tannery (pictured, the site) inhabited by people of the Mexican nobility between 1521 and 1620 AD were also found at the excavation site.

The foundations of a colonial house and a tannery (pictured, the site) inhabited by people of the Mexican nobility between 1521 and 1620 AD were also found at the excavation site.

The foundations of a colonial house and a tannery (pictured, the site) inhabited by people of the Mexican nobility between 1521 and 1620 AD were also found at the excavation site.

According to the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico (INAH), the sweat lodge, known as 'temazcal' in pre-Hispanic culture, was part of the noble neighborhood of Temazcaltitlán, in the Teopan area of ​​the state of Tenochtitlán.

According to the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico (INAH), the sweat lodge, known as 'temazcal' in pre-Hispanic culture, was part of the noble neighborhood of Temazcaltitlán, in the Teopan area of ​​the state of Tenochtitlán.

According to the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico (INAH), the sweat lodge, known as ‘temazcal’ in pre-Hispanic culture, was part of the noble neighborhood of Temazcaltitlán, in the Teopan area of ​​the state of Tenochtitlán.

Tenochtitlan was a large city-state inhabited by the Mexica, the indigenous peoples of the Valley of Mexico who ruled the Aztec Empire between 1428 and 1521 AD.

It is believed that the city was built on an island in what was then Lake Texococo in the Valley of Mexico.

Victor Esperon Calleja told local media: ‘The site is part of a protected area and that is why the INAH Archaeological Rescue Office has intervened.

‘Tenochtitlan was divided into four parts and we are in the part called Teopan in a neighborhood called Temazcaltitlan where the sweat houses were.’

The INAH has confirmed that the temazcal base is 16.4 feet (five meters) long and 9.7 feet (2.98 meters) wide with a bathtub and a bench within its walls.

According to historical records, a lady of the Mexican nobility named Quetzalmoyahuatzin bathed in the temazcal in a ritual of purification before giving birth.

Archaeologists believe that the neighborhood was used as an area to worship female deities such as Ixcuina, the goddess of work; Tlazolteotl the deity of vice, purification, steam baths and lust; and Ayopechtli, the goddess of the birth itself.

Other female deities related to fertility, land or water, such as Coatlicue, Toci, Chalchiuhtlicue and Mayahuel, were also venerated.

According to historical records, a lady of the Mexican nobility named Quetzalmoyahuatzin bathed in the temazcal in a ritual of purification before giving birth. In the picture, the sweat hut during the excavation

According to historical records, a lady of the Mexican nobility named Quetzalmoyahuatzin bathed in the temazcal in a ritual of purification before giving birth. In the picture, the sweat hut during the excavation

According to historical records, a lady of the Mexican nobility named Quetzalmoyahuatzin bathed in the temazcal in a ritual of purification before giving birth. In the picture, the sweat hut during the excavation

The INAH has confirmed that the temazcal base is 16.4 feet (five meters) long and 9.7 feet (2.98 meters) wide with a bathtub and a bench within its walls.

The INAH has confirmed that the temazcal base is 16.4 feet (five meters) long and 9.7 feet (2.98 meters) wide with a bathtub and a bench within its walls.

The INAH has confirmed that the temazcal base is 16.4 feet (five meters) long and 9.7 feet (2.98 meters) wide with a bathtub and a bench within its walls.

Archaeologists believe that the neighborhood was used as an area to worship female deities such as Ixcuina, the goddess of work; Tlazolteotl the deity of vice, purification, steam baths and lust; and Ayopechtli the goddess of birth proper

Archaeologists believe that the neighborhood was used as an area to worship female deities such as Ixcuina, the goddess of work; Tlazolteotl the deity of vice, purification, steam baths and lust; and Ayopechtli the goddess of birth proper

Archaeologists believe that the neighborhood was used as an area to worship female deities such as Ixcuina, the goddess of work; Tlazolteotl the deity of vice, purification, steam baths and lust; and Ayopechtli the goddess of birth proper

How the conqueror Hernán Cortés helped start Spanish rule in central Mexico

Hernán Cortés meeting the Aztec emperor Montezuma, 1519

Hernán Cortés meeting the Aztec emperor Montezuma, 1519

Hernán Cortés meeting the Aztec emperor Montezuma, 1519

Hernán Cortés, born in Medellín, Spain, in 1485, made his name for the first time when he helped Diego Velázquez in his conquest of Cuba.

In 1518, at the age of 33, he convinced Velázquez to let him direct an expedition to Mexico, following in the footsteps of the conqueror Juan de Grijalva, who led an expedition to Yucatán in 1518.

After forming alliances with the indigenous peoples, Cortés marched towards Tenochtitlán, the Aztec capital directed by Moctezuma II.

After a failed attempt to take Tenochtitlan in 1520, Cortes returned in 1521 and began a three-month siege that finally allowed the Spaniards to take control.

Immense cruelty was inflicted on indigenous peoples under the orders of Cortes, as well as countless lives lost due to diseases brought from the West.

He died in Seville on December 2, 1547.

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