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A & # 39; missing link & # 39; between humans and our ape-like ancestors, pictured, who lived about 12 million years ago, was discovered by paleontologists in Bavaria, Germany

A & # 39; missing link & # 39; between humans and our ape-like ancestors who lived about 12 million years ago, was dug up in Bavaria, Germany.

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According to researchers, the bizarre creature had arms suitable for hanging on trees, but legs like ours – making it look like a & # 39; monkey and human in one & # 39 ;.

The discovery gives the first impression of what the last common ancestor of monkeys and humans looked like – with fossils from this period being rare.

Named Danuvius guggenmosi after a Celtic river god, the discovery of the broad-breasted primate also pushes back the timeline for when walking on two feet began.

Based on the shape of the bones of Danuvius, experts have concluded that the animal has moved in a unique way, called & # 39; extended limbs scrambling & # 39 ;.

They describe this technique as a combination of both swinging from branch to branch and walking across the ground.

Danuvius was about three and a half feet tall and weighed up to five stones.

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A & # 39; missing link & # 39; between humans and our ape-like ancestors, pictured, who lived about 12 million years ago, was discovered by paleontologists in Bavaria, Germany

A & # 39; missing link & # 39; between humans and our ape-like ancestors, pictured, who lived about 12 million years ago, was discovered by paleontologists in Bavaria, Germany

& # 39; It is a missing link. It was amazing for us to realize that certain bones are similar to humans as opposed to great apes, & # 39; said paper author and paleontologist Madelaine Boehme of the University of Tübingen in Germany.

& # 39; I was personally most surprised by the amount of Danuvius agreement in the back and tibia, unlike monkeys. This was totally unexpected for all of us. & # 39;

& # 39; Danuvius is like a monkey and a human – in one. & # 39;

& # 39; The ape-like features are the somewhat elongated arms – such as bonobo's, but not as long as those of a gorilla or gibbon – and the opposite big toe. & # 39;

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& # 39; But even his elbow joint is not like large monkeys and resembles humans and small monkeys. & # 39;

& # 39; (It) could hang on its arms on branches.

& # 39; Unlike other monkeys, such as gibbons or orangutans, who do not use their legs as much as their arms for locomotion, these types of hind legs were held upright and could be walked on, & she added .

& # 39; This monkey also had a gripping big toe, which meant that he would have walked on the sole of his foot. & # 39;

Danuvius' teeth identify it as belonging to a group of extinct monkeys, called dryopithecins, found in European rocks from the mid to late Miocene, or about 16–5 million years ago.

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The monkey is said to have had a broad chest, long back and extended hips and knees – as with all animals that walk on two feet, including humans.

The remains were excavated in a mountainous area called the Allgäu, which is nowadays popular with tourists because of its castles in fairy-tale style.

The bones were from at least four people – one male, two female and one juvenile – and included not only teeth but also parts of the skull, jaw, rib cage, and spine, along with bones of arm, leg, finger, and feet.

According to researchers, the bizarre creature had arms suitable for hanging in trees but legs like ours - making it look like a & # 39; monkey and human in one & # 39;

According to researchers, the bizarre creature had arms suitable for hanging in trees but legs like ours - making it look like a & # 39; monkey and human in one & # 39;

According to researchers, the bizarre creature had arms suitable for hanging in trees but legs like ours – making it look like a & # 39; monkey and human in one & # 39;

The discovery gives the first impression of what the last common ancestor of monkeys and humans looked like - with fossils from this period being rare
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The discovery gives the first impression of what the last common ancestor of monkeys and humans looked like - with fossils from this period being rare

The discovery gives the first impression of what the last common ancestor of monkeys and humans looked like – with fossils from this period being rare

The adult man's skeleton was so complete that the researchers could describe his limbs and body proportions in detail.

& # 39; It was comparable in size to modern bonobo & # 39; s. Thanks to fully conserved limbs, vertebrae, fingers and toes, we were able to reconstruct the way in which Danuvius moved in his environment & # 39 ;, Professor Boehme explains.

& Important that for the first time we were able to examine various functionally important joints, including the elbow, wrist, hip, knee and ankle, in a single fossil skeleton of this age. We found the left part of the face of the skull. & # 39;

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& # 39; We could estimate the status – just over a meter (3ft 3in). Females weighed around 19 kg (3 stone) and males 31 kg (5 stone). & # 39;

Danuvius would have had a strong hold and flat, human-like feet for walking. It also had a mobile wrist and hands with bent fingers.

& # 39; Knuckle-walkers such as chimpanzees, bonobos & gorillas & # 39; s lack the extended knee and have a less developed grasp, & # 39; said Professor Boehme.

& # 39; Danuvius fingers also lack the robustness that is typical of knucklers. & # 39;

The uniqueness of Danuvius is demonstrated by its small body size, which was between that of a gibbon and a bonobo, she added.

Named Danuvius guggenmosi after a Celtic river god, the discovery of the broad-breasted primate also pushes back the timeline for when walking on two feet began

Named Danuvius guggenmosi after a Celtic river god, the discovery of the broad-breasted primate also pushes back the timeline for when walking on two feet began

Named Danuvius guggenmosi after a Celtic river god, the discovery of the broad-breasted primate also pushes back the timeline for when walking on two feet began

Based on the shape of the bones of Danuvius, experts have concluded that the animal has moved in a unique way, called & # 39; extended limbs scrambling & # 39 ;. They describe this technique as a combination of both swinging from branch to branch and walking across the ground

Based on the shape of the bones of Danuvius, experts have concluded that the animal has moved in a unique way, called & # 39; extended limbs scrambling & # 39 ;. They describe this technique as a combination of both swinging from branch to branch and walking across the ground

Based on the shape of the bones of Danuvius, experts have concluded that the animal has moved in a unique way, called & # 39; extended limbs scrambling & # 39 ;. They describe this technique as a combination of both swinging from branch to branch and walking across the ground

& # 39; It is a missing link. It was amazing for us to realize that certain bones are similar to humans, as opposed to great apes, & # 39; said paper author and paleontologist Madelaine Boehme of the University of Tübingen in Germany.

& # 39; It is a missing link. It was amazing for us to realize that certain bones are similar to humans, as opposed to great apes, & # 39; said paper author and paleontologist Madelaine Boehme of the University of Tübingen in Germany.

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& # 39; It is a missing link. It was amazing for us to realize that certain bones are similar to humans, as opposed to great apes, & # 39; said paper author and paleontologist Madelaine Boehme of the University of Tübingen in Germany.

& # 39; The emerging image of its movement differs from every known living being, & # 39; Professor Boehme added.

& # 39; Living primates prefer their arms or their hind legs – jumping monkeys and humans respectively. & # 39;

& # 39; Danuvius shows that upright walking came from the trees, not on the ground, and early people did not go through a phase of bent joint walks. & # 39;

& # 39; Our last common ancestor with great apes didn't look like a chimpanzee or a living great ape – he might look like Danuvius. & # 39;

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& # 39; Danuvius shows us the circumstances from which both great apes and humans diverged. And this evolution process happened in Europe. & # 39;

& # 39; Our findings greatly enhance our knowledge about Miocene hominids – African monkeys and humans. They add bipedalism to the spectrum of behaviors. & # 39;

The bones were from at least four people - one male, two female and a juvenile - and included not only teeth but also parts of the skull, jaw, rib cage and spine, along with bones for arm, leg, finger and feet

The bones were from at least four people - one male, two female and a juvenile - and included not only teeth but also parts of the skull, jaw, rib cage and spine, along with bones for arm, leg, finger and feet

The bones were from at least four people – one male, two female and a juvenile – and included not only teeth but also parts of the skull, jaw, rib cage and spine, along with bones for arm, leg, finger and feet

Danuvius would have had a strong hold and flat, human-like feet for walking. It also had a mobile wrist and hands with bent fingers

Danuvius would have had a strong hold and flat, human-like feet for walking. It also had a mobile wrist and hands with bent fingers

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Danuvius would have had a strong hold and flat, human-like feet for walking. It also had a mobile wrist and hands with bent fingers

The research may answer the question of what kind of early propulsion underlies our bipedal origins, said University of Kent anthropologist Tracy Kivell, who was not involved in the current study.

& # 39; That would bring us closer to the answer to why and how our human ancestors became less dependent on life in the trees and embrace bipedal terrestrial movement, & # 39; she added.

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Nature.

The remains of Danuvius were excavated in a mountainous area called the Allgäu, which is nowadays popular with tourists because of its castles in fairy-tale style

The remains of Danuvius were excavated in a mountainous area called the Allgäu, which is nowadays popular with tourists because of its castles in fairy-tale style

The remains of Danuvius were excavated in a mountainous area called the Allgäu, which is nowadays popular with tourists because of its castles in fairy-tale style

WHEN DO PEOPLE HAVE FIRST FIRST?

The timeline of human evolution can be traced back millions of years. Experts estimate that the family tree as such goes:

55 million years ago – First primitive primates evolve

15 million years ago – Hominidae (great apes) evolve from the ancestors of the gibbon

7 million years ago – First gorillas evolve. Later chimp and human lines diverge

A recreation of a Neanderthal is shown

A recreation of a Neanderthal is shown

A recreation of a Neanderthal is shown

5.5 million years ago – Ardipithecus, early & # 39; proto-human & # 39; shares properties with chimpanzees and gorillas & # 39; s

4 million years ago – Monkey like early people, the Australopithecines appeared. They had brains no larger than those of a chimpanzee, but other, more human traits

3.9-2.9 million years ago – Australoipithecus afarensis lived in Africa.

2.7 million years ago – Paranthropus, lived in forests and had huge jaws to chew

2.6 million years ago – Hand axes become the first major technological innovation

2.3 million years ago – Homo habilis first thought to have appeared in Africa

1.85 million years ago – First & # 39; modern & # 39; hand appears

1.8 million years ago – Homo ergaster begins to appear in fossils

800,000 years ago – Early people control fire and create fireplaces. The brain size is increasing rapidly

400,000 years agoO – Neanderthals appear for the first time and spread across Europe and Asia

300,000 to 200,000 years ago – Homo sapiens – modern people – appear in Africa

50,000 to 40,000 years ago – Modern people reach Europe

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