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Smissen said that an often-incorrectly pronounced word & # 39; clothing & # 39; is, and says that Australians often drop the TH sounds from the word
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An Australian YouTuber has given a watertight manual on how to pronounce everyday words as a true Aussie.

Peter Smissen, who created the popular channel & # 39; Aussie English & # 39; , an audience of over 90,000 people has learned how to intentionally pronounce words incorrectly in an Australian way.

Clothing / & # 39; cloos & # 39;

Smissen said that an often-incorrectly pronounced word & # 39; clothing & # 39; is, and says that Australians often drop the TH sounds from the word.

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& # 39; This is reduced to & # 39; cloos & # 39;, & # 39; said Smissen.

& # 39; There is no TH, the TH is thrown, discarded, it is deleted, it is discarded, it is goodbye TH, & # 39; Smissen joked.

The YouTube sensation compared the Aussie version of the word to & # 39; close & # 39 ;.

Smissen said that an often-incorrectly pronounced word & # 39; clothing & # 39; is, and says that Australians often drop the TH sounds from the word

Smissen said that an often-incorrectly pronounced word & # 39; clothing & # 39; is, and says that Australians often drop the TH sounds from the word

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Wanted / & # 39; Ast & # 39;

Smissen said that to sound like a native Australian, people must replace the KED in the word & # 39; asked & # 39; to easily sound like & # 39; ast & # 39 ;.

& # 39; This contains quite a few different consonants. It is very difficult to say quickly, so we often lose the K.

Exactly & & # 39; Ig-za-kly & # 39;

According to Smissen

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& # 39; It's too hard to & # 39; to say exactly & # 39; said Smissen while pronouncing each letter, & # 39; so we just get rid of the T and say & # 39; igzakly & # 39 ;, & # 39; said Smissen.

Smissen told his viewers that the word & # 39; correct & # 39; contains too many syllables and must also be shortened

Smissen told his viewers that the word & # 39; correct & # 39; contains too many syllables and must also be shortened

Smissen told his viewers that the word & # 39; correct & # 39; contains too many syllables and must also be shortened

Good / & # 39; pro-ply & # 39;

Smissen told his viewers that the word & # 39; correct & # 39; contains too many syllables and must also be shortened.

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& # 39; Do we speak well when we speak quickly? No, we speak appropriately & he joked.

Probably / & # 39; Probably & # 39;

& # 39; This too is (is) too long. We lose one of those syllables and say & # 39; probably & # 39 ;, Smissen said.

& # 39; It is probably not correct to say & # 39;

Library / & # 39; li-be-rry & # 39; / & # 39; li-bry & # 39;

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Like the other words on the list, Smissen said it is difficult to pronounce every syllable in the library, so again, it is shortened.

But to sound like a born and raised Australian, he said there are two options for this word.

& # 39; This can also be it. You can & # 39; li-berry & # 39; or & # 39; li-bry & # 39; say, & # 39; he said.

February / & # 39; fe edit & # 39;

& # 39; This looks like a kind of & # 39; library & # 39 ;, Smissen said.

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& # 39; Those two R & # 39; s out there are a bit weird, so they are said as "fe-bew-ry"

Laboratory / & # 39; la-bre-to-ry & # 39;

Another word with multiple syllables that when said quickly sounds very different from how it is spelled is & # 39; laboratory & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Again, too long, cut that stuff down! & # 39; he said.

Cupboard / & # 39; cah-bed & # 39;

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& # 39; Nobody, nowhere would ever & # 39; box & # 39; say, Smissen told his viewers.

& # 39; It contains two consonants, the P and the B, and we only say the B & # 39 ;.

Another word with multiple syllables that when said quickly sounds very different from how it is spelled is & # 39; laboratory & # 39;

Another word with multiple syllables that when said quickly sounds very different from how it is spelled is & # 39; laboratory & # 39;

Another word with multiple syllables that when said quickly sounds very different from how it is spelled is & # 39; laboratory & # 39;

Chocolate / & # 39; choet & # 39;

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Smissen advises people who want to sound more Australian, the word & # 39; chocolate & # 39; as soon as possible.

& # 39; You wouldn't say & # 39; choc-o-late & # 39; (it is) too long, & # 39; he said.

Smissen told Daily Mail Australia that he started his YouTube channel in 2016 after searching online for sources for Australian English.

& # 39; I found no YouTube channels, no podcasts, no real content, I decided that I could try to produce the content to help people in the situation of my French friends, & # 39; he said.

Smissen spent 12 years of his life studying science, but faced with the prospect of spending the rest of his life at a desk, he stopped studying and turned his channel into a full-time job with a sustainable income.

Smissen spent 12 years of his life studying science, but stopped and turned his channel into a full-time job with a sustainable income
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Smissen spent 12 years of his life studying science, but stopped and turned his channel into a full-time job with a sustainable income

Smissen spent 12 years of his life studying science, but stopped and turned his channel into a full-time job with a sustainable income

& # 39; It is enough to support us and continues to grow month after month & # 39 ;, said the father of one.

Despite the fact that many viewers find humor in his tongue-in-cheek content, the father of one said that his channel is just as much about education.

& # 39; Every day I receive emails saying that I help people improve their English, improve their lives, find a job, make friends and I can't imagine that I would do anything else with my life , & # 39; he said.

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& # 39; The best thing is that I earn a living to help people. Science was interesting, but I have never received almost the same kind of supportive feedback from people about my work. & # 39;

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