16 C
London
Monday, May 29, 2023
HomeLifestyle10 Surprising Distinctions Between the United States and Japan from the Perspective...

10 Surprising Distinctions Between the United States and Japan from the Perspective of an American Residing in Okinawa

Date:

What do expensive watermelons, friendly locals, and clean toilets have in common?

It’s all the things you’ll find in Japan, according to American expats currently living on the island of Okinawa.

in Tik Tok — viewed over 5 million times — Courtney Ramirez identifies “10 things that drove me into a ‘coma’ as an American living in Japan.”

Some of the topics the Michigan native touches on include food etiquette, prices, cleanliness, friendliness, and how Japan compares to the United States. Scroll down for some of her great insights.

On TikTok — which has been viewed more than 5 million times — Courtney Ramirez identifies “10 things that drove me into a ‘coma’ as an American living in Japan”

Some of the topics the Michigan native touches on include food etiquette, prices, cleanliness and friendliness, and how Japan compares to the United States.

Some of the topics the Michigan native touches on include food etiquette, prices, cleanliness and friendliness, and how Japan compares to the United States.

1. Food has different values ​​back home

TikToker says that the fruit is very expensive in Japan, and gives an example, a single watermelon can cost up to $30.

Meanwhile, fried chicken is a holiday food and sushi and seafood are “cheap as hell,” compared to America where they are considered luxuries.

2. Children are very independent

In Japan, Courtney says you’ll often see very young children outside by yourself, but you don’t need to worry.

She explains: ‘You’ll see a four-year-old on the street and I promise you a four-year-old knows how to become an adult better than you.

“I promise… He’s fine by himself.”

3. Nobody steals cars

Courtney says theft is so rare in Japan, that car dealerships will leave keys inside unlocked vehicles.

She says this is a nice perk because if you rent or buy a car, you don’t need a dealership up your ass to look at the car because it’s already unlocked… because no one is going to steal a s***’s car here. Crazy right?

4. The public toilets are very clean

While public bathrooms can be hit or miss in the United States, Courtney says the bathrooms in Japan are the cleanest she’s ever seen.

Even the toilets at 7-Eleven sparkle, she reveals, “and are probably cleaner than your bathroom at home.”

While public bathrooms can be hit or miss in the US, Courtney says the bathrooms in Japan are the cleanest she's ever seen

While public bathrooms can be hit or miss in the US, Courtney says the bathrooms in Japan are the cleanest she’s ever seen

While it can be difficult to make friends in new countries, Courtney says she has had no problem in Japan, where she met

Instead of meeting a receptionist or host at a restaurant, in Japan 90 percent of the time

Instead of meeting a receptionist or host at a restaurant, in Japan 90 percent of the time “you’ll have to check-in with a machine,” Courtney says.

5. Gas stations offer the most delicious food

Another thing that surprised Courtney after moving to Japan was the quality of the food at the gas stations.

She tells viewers, “Gas station stores have the best food ever.

“You want food, you’re hungry and you’re on the road… Maybe you can get some gas station food and you won’t put your pants on anymore.”

6. Friendly locals

While it can be difficult to make friends in new countries, Courtney says she had no problem in Japan, where she met “the friendliest people ever.”

“The locals here are the friendliest,” she says. “If they understand you or not, they will approach you, and they will hang out with you.”

“They’re not trying to kidnap you, they’re not going to ask you for money, they’re just going to sit next to you…you’re going to watch the sunset together, and that’s literally what happened to me.”

7. Car park for mothers with sleeping children

Oddly enough, Courtney reveals that in Japan “there are parking spaces literally reserved for mothers with babies in the car.”

This is so mothers can go, “run their fast errands and leave their children in the car because no one is going to take their child, because the Japanese community in Japan has decided to protect their children.”

8. Everyone should recycle waste

Recycling rules are very strict in Japan, according to Courtney, and she says, “If you don’t separate[in]the trash and the recyclable, they won’t take it.”

“They take really good care of the environment here, so they want to separate the garbage,” she adds.

9. Restaurants have check-in machines

Instead of meeting a receptionist or host at a restaurant, in Japan 90 percent of the time “you’ll have to check-in with a machine,” Courtney says.

She says sometimes this can be difficult because not all devices have English and she sometimes “guesses” what the different buttons mean.

Americans advises viewers to use Google Translate on their phones to decipher instructions and menus.

10. Food quality is great

Compared to America, Courtney says the food in Japan is “terribly better.”

“I can smell food in the States and get sick,” she muses. Here, I can eat anything and everything and feel like a million bucks afterwards. It’s literally no wonder that this place has the lowest obesity rate and the longest lifespan of people.

Jackyhttps://whatsnew2day.com/
The author of what'snew2day.com is dedicated to keeping you up-to-date on the latest news and information.

Latest stories

spot_img