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Ten unnamed people in Franklin County, Ohio, took an overdose for more than 26 hours, according to the Coroner's Office. It can be linked to fentanyl, the synthetic opioids 100 times stronger than morphine (file image)

10 residents of a single county in Ohio die fatally with drugs that are likely to be punctured with fentanyl in just 26 hours

  • 10 people overdosed in 26 hours in Franklin County, Ohio, starting at 10 am on Sunday
  • The Coroner & # 39; s Office did not reveal which drug was involved in death, but suggested that it may be related to fentanyl
  • Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is 100 times stronger than morphine
  • Officials suggested that residents carry the anti-overdose drug naloxone in case an overdose occurs
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At least ten people died last weekend in a district of Ohio in 26 hours of drug doses.

The Franklin County Coroner & # 39; s Office said on Sunday that it believes the deaths could be related to fentanyl, the synthetic opioid that is 100 times stronger than morphine.

None of the victim's names, ages or genders are currently released.

Province officials are now urging residents to always carry the anti-overdose medicine naloxone with them in case a beloved opioid overdose occurs.

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Ten unnamed people in Franklin County, Ohio, took an overdose for more than 26 hours, according to the Coroner's Office. It can be linked to fentanyl, the synthetic opioids 100 times stronger than morphine (file image)

Ten unnamed people in Franklin County, Ohio, took an overdose for more than 26 hours, according to the Coroner's Office. It can be linked to fentanyl, the synthetic opioids 100 times stronger than morphine (file image)

& # 39; From about 10 o'clock this morning we have 10 people die from overdoses in about 26 hours & # 39 ;, said Franklin County Coroner Anahi Ortiz in a pronunciation on Facebook on Sunday.

& # 39; This is an unusually high number for our province during this period.

& # 39; We currently know that fentanyl can be mixed with cocaine and methamphetamine. These can be deadly combinations for those who use. & # 39;

This is not the first time that Franklin County has been affected by multiple deaths from overdoses in a short period.

Last month, the Coroner & # 39; s Office reported that six people were fatally overdosing in less than 24 hours between 10 and 11 August. And in July, nine residents died of overdoses over the course of two days.

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A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) last year revealed that more than 70,000 people died of drug overdoses in 2017.

While the opioid epidemic is getting worse, Ohio is one of the hardest hit by a declining economy and a large prison population.

In 2017, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Buckeye state had the second highest percentage of fatal opioid overdoses.

The state had a rate of 39.2 deaths per 100,000 people – more than two and a half times the national average.

Synthetic opioids, primarily fentanyl, have been blamed for a growing number of deaths in Ohio, from 139 deaths in 2012 to 3,523 deaths in 2017.

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Fentanyl, which is often mixed with other medicines, is extremely powerful. Only 0.25 milligrams can kill someone.

In 2017, Franklin County has a & # 39; Opiate Action Plan & # 39; released with four goals: to prevent abuse and addiction of opioids, to reduce fatal overdoses of opioids, to increase access to treatments and to improve community safety.

The website for the city of Columbus, which is in the county, it also states where people get naloxone and free fentanyl test strips.

The Franklin County Coroner office did not immediately return the request for comment from DailyMail.com.

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