1.5 million jobs now run a & # 39; high risk & # 39; on automation, reveal official figures

Rise of the robots: 1.5 million jobs are now running a & # 39; high risk & # 39; of automation, revealing official figures – and the most endangered roles are women & # 39;

  • The survey shows that women, young people and part-timers will be the hardest hit
  • Professions that are most at risk are waiters, shelf fillers and those in sales professions
  • Those with the lowest risk are doctors and senior professionals
  • Areas with the highest risk are parts of Staffordshire, Rutland and Lincolnshire

Nearly 1.5 million jobs are in danger of being replaced by robots, a new study by the Office of National Statistics (ONS) has revealed.

Women and young people are at a higher risk than other demographic groups in their job.

The ONS analyzed the jobs of 20 million people from 2011 and 2017 in England and discovered that this 7.4 percent runs a high automation risk.

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Nearly 1.5 million jobs are in danger of being replaced by robots, a new study by the Office of National Statistics (ONS) has revealed. According to the data, women, part-time workers and young people run a higher risk than other demographers in their work

Nearly 1.5 million jobs are in danger of being replaced by robots, a new study by the Office of National Statistics (ONS) has revealed. According to the data, women, part-time workers and young people run a higher risk than other demographers in their work

70 percent of the jobs were in the hands of women.

It was also determined that 16 percent of working 20 to 24 year olds will be affected.

A review of 20 million jobs found the risk of task automation decreases as employees age, and is lowest for people aged 35 to 39, the US said.

The areas in England with the lowest risk of jobs being automated in 2017 would be Camden in London, Three Rivers in Hertfordshire and Oxford.

The ONS analyzed the jobs of 20 million people in 2011 and 2017 in England and discovered that the 7.4 percent run a high automation risk. 70 percent of the jobs were in the hands of women

The ONS analyzed the jobs of 20 million people in 2011 and 2017 in England and discovered that the 7.4 percent run a high automation risk. 70 percent of the jobs were in the hands of women

The ONS analyzed the jobs of 20 million people in 2011 and 2017 in England and discovered that the 7.4 percent run a high automation risk. 70 percent of the jobs were in the hands of women

Areas with the highest risk are Tamworth in Staffordshire, Rutland and South Holland in Lincolnshire.

The three professions with the greatest chance of automation are waiters and waitresses, shelf fillers and sales professions, according to the report.

The three professions with the lowest risk of automation were reportedly medical practitioners, higher education education professionals and senior professionals of educational institutions.

The reasons for the decline are unclear, but it is possible that the automation of some jobs has already happened, such as self-checkouts for supermarkets, to which the ONS has been added.

People who are most at risk of losing their job with a ROBOT

  • Waiters and waitresses
  • Shelf fillers
  • Sales professions

People from:

  • Tamworth in Staffordshire
  • Rutland
  • South Holland in Lincolnshire

PEOPLE WITH THE LEAST RISK OF LOSSES THEIR JOB TOWARDS A ROBOT

  • Doctors
  • University teachers
  • Senior education professionals

People from:

  • Camden in London
  • Three Rivers in Hertfordshire
  • Oxford

A recent study by Cornell University researchers showed that when people were placed in direct competition with robots, this discouraged participants and led themselves to find themselves less competent.

One participant admitted that they were & # 39; very stressed to compete with the robot & # 39 ;.

& # 39; In some rounds, I continued to see the robot score rise from the corner of my eye, which was hugely nerve-racking, & # 39; she added.

In an ever-increasing automated workplace, the researchers said their findings have serious implications.

Guy Hoffman, assistant professor at the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering said: & # 39; Think of a cashier working side by side with an automatic check-out machine, or someone driving a forklift in a warehouse that also uses delivery robots that are right ride next to them.

& # 39; Although it can be tempting to design such robots for optimum productivity, engineers and managers need to take into account how the performance of the robot can affect the effort and attitude of humans towards the robot and even towards themselves & # 39;

WILL YOUR JOB BE TAKEN BY A ROBOT?

A November 2017 report suggested that physical jobs in predictable environments, including machine operators and fast food workers, are most likely to be replaced by robots.

Management consulting firm McKinsey, based in New York, focused on the number of jobs that would be lost to automation and which occupations were most at risk.

The report says that data collection and processing are two other categories of activities that can be done better and faster with machines.

This can displace large amounts of work, for example with mortgages, paralegal work, bookkeeping and back-office transaction processing.

Conversely, jobs in unpredictable environments are the least risky.

The report adds: & # 39; Professions such as gardeners, plumbers or providers of childcare and elderly care will generally also see less automation by 2030, because they are technically difficult to automate and often have relatively lower wages, which makes automation a less attractive company makes proposition. & # 39;

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