Advertisements
Cases have been reported of a newborn infant or the grasping of a device, called electrodes (photo), used to monitor the mother's vitals

A hug & # 39; skin to skin & # 39; Immediately after giving birth in the C-section can endanger both mother and baby, anesthesiologists have warned.

Advertisements

Doctors have reported two cases where newborns suck or grab electrical plasters on mother's skin to check her heartbeat.

This means that the heart activity of the mother and newborn can fuse together on the monitors, causing alarm bells to sound.

Doctors can then confuse the alarm with a life-threatening problem with the mother, experts have warned.

There are fears that it can even lead to incorrectly administered medication or shock the mother with an electric shock. Although this has not yet happened.

In one case, the baby was found that was nursing an electrode on their mother's breast after he had mistaken it for a nipple.

But experts working in the UK have expressed doubts about the concerns and said the hugs are usually safe and an important moment during birth.

Advertisements

Cases have been reported of a newborn infant or the grasping of a device, called electrodes (photo), used to monitor the mother's vitals

Cases have been reported of a newborn infant or the grasping of a device, called electrodes (photo), used to monitor the mother's vitals

A hug immediately after birth is an important part of maternal and baby bonding because it helps the baby feel safe and learn to breastfeed.

But after a C-section, the mother's breast has electrodes on the skin.

The electrodes detect heart activity and produce a visual graph on a screen called an electrocardiogram (ECG).

Doctors can continuously monitor the heartbeat during the procedure. They also monitor blood pressure, breathing and oxygen levels in the blood.

But it is possible that the baby's own heart activity will be picked up if it comes in contact with the electrode, leading to hay cable results.

Advertisements

Writing in the European Journal of Anesthesiology, doctors described two recent cases.

The first case involved a 37-year-old mother who had a C-section for the first time at La Zarzuela University Hospital, Madrid.

Dr. Nicolas Brogly, who works in the hospital and is co-author of the paper, said: & # 39; The newborn was found to suck the correct electrode from the ECG. & # 39;

In the Netherlands, a baby grabbed a thread (photo) that measures his mother's heartbeat

In the Netherlands, a baby grabbed a thread (photo) that measures his mother's heartbeat

In the Netherlands, a baby grabbed a thread (photo) that measures his mother's heartbeat

Advertisements

It was not explained how this could be a danger to the baby, but it is considered unsafe for a newborn to put electrical equipment in their mouths.

Doctors placed the electrodes elsewhere on the woman's skin and the abnormal rhythm – a combination of her own heartbeat and that of her baby – disappeared.

The second case was recorded by Dr. Leonie Slegers and her team at the St. Antonius Hospital in Woerden, the Netherlands.

A 36-year-old woman had just given birth to her second child, a healthy baby boy, who was then placed on her chest.

Shortly thereafter, her heartbeat became abnormally fast – known as tachycardia – that can cause heart failure or stroke.

Advertisements

The patient still had the baby on her chest while doctors checked her other vital functions.

They were normal and the ECG seemed to contain two different ECG rhythms in one shot.

Dr. Slegers said: “A quick inspection of the baby showed that he had taken the correct ECG lead.

In one case study, an ECG (photo) gave doctors a fear because it picked up the heartbeat of both the mother and the baby and gave the impression of a dangerous situation

In one case study, an ECG (photo) gave doctors a fear because it picked up the heartbeat of both the mother and the baby and gave the impression of a dangerous situation

In one case study, an ECG (photo) gave doctors a fear because it picked up the heartbeat of both the mother and the baby and gave the impression of a dangerous situation

Advertisements

& # 39; After gently moving this to lead to the right shoulder of the mother, the ECG returned to normal. & # 39;

Dr. Brogly said: & # 39; This new source of electrical interference poses a risk to both the mother and the baby.

& # 39; The alarm on the monitor could have led to an incorrect diagnosis with supraventricular arrhythmia, which could then have led to the administration of antiarrhythmics, or worse, the use of the mother's defibrillator to stabilize her heartbeat. & # 39;

But Pat & Brien, spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, said early contact is vital – especially with C-sections on the rise.

& # 39; Early skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn baby can improve breastfeeding, which is accompanied by many health benefits for women and their babies & # 39; s, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Skin-to-skin contact is usually not difficult to achieve during caesarean section, as long as the mother and baby are good.

"It is very important in this environment to ensure that the newborn baby does not get cold.

"Ideally, the baby should be dried, placed skin to skin on the mother's breast and covered with a warm towel or blanket."

There are very few indications for electrical interference after a C-section, the doctors said.

But this may be because hugging skin on skin is not always possible after a C-section in an emergency.

Advertisements

Electrical interference can also occur if a woman has a vaginal birth and a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator that treats labor.

The authors conclude that midwifery teams must be aware of the placement of electrodes. They can instead be placed on the back or chest edges.

BABY GRIPES ELECTRODES AFTER BIRTH

Doctors reported two cases in which a heart activity of a mother and her baby was combined in the European Journal of Anesthesiology.

A 37-year-old mother who has a C-section for the first time at La Zarzuela University Hospital, Madrid.

The baby's head was too large to fit through the mother's pelvis and she received a standard epidural.

Advertisements

Shortly thereafter, a healthy baby boy was delivered without major bleeding.

After the baby's first examination, he was placed on his mother's chest to provide early SSC.

Co-author of the article, Dr. Nicolas Brogly, who works in the hospital, said: & # 39; Shortly thereafter, the heart rate alarm was activated on the monitor due to a marked dramatic increase in the mother's heartbeat.

& # 39; However, the woman remained conscious and without complaints. & # 39;

The other vital functions of the mother were normal, including her radial pulse and blood pressure remained normal.

Advertisements

The positioning of the electrodes was checked to investigate possible interference with the electrical activity of the baby heart.

The newborn appeared to suck the correct electrode from the ECG, which was immediately replaced by another spot on the mother's skin.

The second case was handled by Dr. Leonie Slegers and her team at the St. Antonius Hospital, Woerden, the Netherlands.

A 36-year-old woman who had her second child was 40 weeks pregnant and, like the first woman, had no history of heart disease.

The baby's head struggled to get out, so doctors went to a C-section.

The woman remained stable all the time and the operation produced a healthy baby boy who was placed on her chest, with warm blankets on both.

Shortly thereafter, the ECG changed into an abnormally fast rhythm, called tachycardia.

The patient still had the baby on her chest and although her other vital functions were normal, the ECG seemed to contain two different ECG rhythms in one shot.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) health