& # 039; It was a terrifying 12 o'clock & # 039;: 7-year-old temporarily paralyzed by toxins from a tick bite

A week and a half after her first ever summer campaign, Jenna Ganahl, seven, could not feel her legs.

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At first it seemed as if her legs had just gone to sleep, as everyone occasionally does when we sit too long, but the next morning the little girl's legs didn't seem to work.

Her mother, Heidi, was terrified and hurried her daughter to the doctor.

Heidi had no idea what such a thing could do for her energetic, healthy little girl, and would never be able to guess the diagnosis that doctors eventually gave: paralysis of ticks.

She had no idea that the few tiny parasites embedded in Jenna & # 39; s hair when she returned from the camp could do such a thing, according to Heidi's Facebook message.

And doctors warned that the unusually warm, wet summer of Colorado could mean more children at risk of temporary paralysis.

Heidi Ganahl (left) plucked some sign from her daughter, Jenna & (39) s (right) head after the seve-year-old came home from the camp, but a small piece of one of the insects left in the scalp of the girl made sure that she developed rare, temporary paralysis of the tick

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Heidi Ganahl (left) plucked some sign from her daughter, Jenna & (39) s (right) head after the seve-year-old came home from the camp, but a small piece of one of the insects left in the scalp of the girl made sure that she developed rare, temporary paralysis of the tick

The US is getting warmer and wetter because climate change is changing our environment.

That is good news for the population of deer, dogs and black-legged ticks and bad for the people and pets they like to hunt.

Dealing with a tick bite is usually only itchy and unpleasant as they must be carefully plucked from the skin where they bury their heads to waste themselves on the blood of mammals.

But as the number or tick that lives and feeds in the US increases, so does the number of people getting sick from the parasites.

In 2017, tickborne diseases hit a record number of 59,349 people, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Those diseases include the dreaded Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Powassan virus, tularemia and anaplasmosis / ehrlichiosis.

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But a disease is not caused by a bacterial or viral species bearing the ticks, but by a connection of the animal itself.

The saliva of ticks contains a neurotoxin that can seep into the human bloodstream if you are bitten by a tick.

There are 40 species of parasites that carry the immobilizing toxin, according to the American Lyme Disease Foundation.

Interestingly enough, the toxin appears to be present in a female tick that carries eggs and reaches a human when she bites and attaches to a host to feed.

But it's a slow process.

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Paralysis is possible only after five to seven days after the tick adheres, and it cannot begin as paralysis, but as fatigue, weakness, numbness, and muscle aches.

Jenna had numbness, that feeling that her legs & # 39; asleep & # 39; goods.

Her mother, Heidi, & # 39; had a bad feeling & # 39; and brought her to the doctor.

She told the doctors about the sign she had found after the summer camp in Jenna & that she had pulled them out.

The female tick's saliva with eggs (not shown) can contain a paralyzing neurotoxin. If a small amount of the parasite is not carefully and cleanly removed, the toxins can continue to seep into the body of the host, causing paralysis in rare cases

The female tick's saliva with eggs (not shown) can contain a paralyzing neurotoxin. If a small amount of the parasite is not carefully and cleanly removed, the toxins can continue to seep into the body of the host, causing paralysis in rare cases

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The female tick's saliva with eggs (not shown) can contain a paralyzing neurotoxin. If a small amount of the parasite is not carefully and cleanly removed, the toxins can continue to seep into the body of the host, causing paralysis in rare cases

Jenna told her mother that she had had enough of the forest for a while after meeting the rare hurt clatter

Jenna told her mother that she had had enough of the forest for a while after meeting the rare hurt clatter

Jenna told her mother that she had had enough of the forest for a while after meeting the rare hurt clatter

But after careful inspection, the doctors found a small fragment of a tick left behind when Heidi had removed the insects.

& # 39; It was only caught because of the great documents (most CU School of Medicine) that recognized the similarities with two other cases there in recent weeks (it is extremely rare so it was very abnormal to see 3 cases in 3 weeks ), & # 39; wrote Heidi on Facebook.

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This is usually the way of tick paralysis – it comes in periodic waves, probably when the weather conditions are optimal for ticks to fertilize or lay their eggs.

& # 39; It was a terrifying 12 hour while we waited to see if they were able to remove the little bit of tick left in her because the toxin had been cleansed from the wound (they didn't see it) & # 39 ;, wrote Heidi.

& # 39; The only solution is to get it out or things get very bad. & # 39;

The patients die in approximately 12 percent of untreated cases. But luckily the toxin stops as soon as the tick is removed to the person and the paralysis decreases.

& # 39; She's fine! & # 39; Jenna & # 39; s mother wrote.

& # 39; Other than never wanting to go into the forest again.

& # 39; I learned more about ticks than I ever wanted to know – the wet weather causes a bad tick season, check your little ones often, if you find one remove them with tweezers and scrub the wound to thoroughly clean it with soap and water to ensure that you get everything, watch the symptoms for 14 days. Take this seriously this year. & # 39;

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