& # 039; Everything is calm & # 039;: Cosmonaut relieves worries about the hole in the International Space Station

Sergei Prokopyev explained in a video published by the Russian space agency Roscosmos how the crew located and sealed the small hole that created a slight loss of pressure last week.

A member of the Russian crew on the International Space Station (ISS) has said that "life is peaceful" and the hole has been fixed in an attempt to address concerns about air leakage in the outpost in orbit.

The & # 39; micro fracture & # 39; which is believed to be about 2 mm wide in the $ 150 billion space station (£ 115 billion) was discovered after the astronauts noticed a drop in pressure on August 29.

Last week, a Russian official said that the leak of ISS could have been caused deliberately by someone in the field.

The cosmonaut Sergei Prokopyev explained in a video published by the Russian space agency Roscosmos how the crew located last week and sealed the small hole that created a slight loss of pressure.

Speaking from the Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked at the station, where the leak was detected, Mr. Prokopyev said the hole was quickly patched up, and added with a smile that we're not trying to cover it with our fingers & # 39; .

The state news agency RIA Novosti reported that a government commission investigating the mysterious drilling well had not been able to determine what had caused it.

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Sergei Prokopyev explained in a video published by the Russian space agency Roscosmos how the crew located and sealed the small hole that created a slight loss of pressure last week.

Sergei Prokopyev explained in a video published by the Russian space agency Roscosmos how the crew located and sealed the small hole that created a slight loss of pressure last week.

Roscosmos director Dmitry Rogozin said the hole could have been drilled during manufacturing or while in orbit.

He did not say if he suspected any of the current crew of three Americans, two Russians and a German aboard the station.

Prokopyev said the crew is in a good mood.

"As you can see, everything is fine on board and we live peacefully together as always," he said in the video, in which he speaks in Russian.

"Our joint international expedition is working in a friendly environment."

The hole covered with dark sealant is hidden under a padded fin, Prokopyev showed in a video he said he had made to "dispel rumors".

Prokopyev described how astronauts discovered "a 2 mm hole where the air exited" and covered it with three layers of sealant.

"Please, do not worry, we're fine," the smiling cosmonaut said, assuring viewers that the module is now "completely hermetically sealed."

"As you can see, we can easily be here without space helmets and no one is covering the hole with a finger while writing in the media."

Prokopyev's video provoked grateful comments on his social media page, with the writing of Diana Apalikova: "You are doing very well, yes, people were worried too much".

Others joked about the incident, like Alexey Bolkisev, who wrote: "Next time try to drill holes when you're sober."

Speaking from the Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked at the station, where the leak was detected (pictured), Mr. Prokopyev said the hole was quickly patched, and added with a smile that we're not trying to cover it with your fingers & # 39;

Speaking from the Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked at the station, where the leak was detected (pictured), Mr. Prokopyev said the hole was quickly patched, and added with a smile that we're not trying to cover it with your fingers & # 39;

Speaking from the Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked at the station, where the leak was detected (pictured), Mr. Prokopyev said the hole was quickly patched, and added with a smile that we're not trying to cover it with your fingers & # 39;

WHAT COULD HAVE CAUSED A HOLE IN THE ISS?

A small hole appeared in a Russian space capsule blocked on the ISS on August 29.

The "micro fracture," which is believed to be about 2 mm wide in the $ 150 billion space station, was discovered after the astronauts noticed a drop in pressure.

According to reports, the astronaut of the European Space Agency, Alexander Gerst, ran his finger through the hole before the crew repaired it with adhesive tape.

The hole was confirmed to be repaired on Friday (August 31) after the cabin pressure returned to normal.

Initially it was believed to have been caused by a small meteorite and the astronauts used tape to seal the leak after it caused a small loss of pressure.

However, as the investigation progressed, it began to look like the hole was made by someone inside and not by the outside, either on Earth or in space, the Russian space agency said.

A leading theory from an unidentified source in Energy has said that the hole was made in the ground, potentially caused by "deliberate interference," with suggestions that the responsible person may have already been identified.

The head of the space agency, Dmitry Rogozin, said on September 4 that the hole was caused by a drill and could have been done with a "wavering hand".

Another anonymous source said that the set was punctured by a worker who hid his mistake with a stamp instead of reporting it.

Previously, Rogozin had said that the hole in the side of the Soyuz ship used to transport astronauts was probably caused from outside by a small meteorite.

However, he says that the theory has already been discarded.

NASA still has to comment on whether it could have been caused from within.

Last week, the head of the space agency Dmitry Rogozin revealed that the hole in a Russian spacecraft docked at the station of the orbit was caused by a drill held with a "wavering hand".

A commission will seek to identify the culprit by name, Rogozin said, describing this as "a matter of honor". for the Russian space manufacturing company Energia, which manufactured the Soyuz spacecraft.

Initially it was believed to have been caused by a small meteorite and the astronauts used tape to seal the leak after it caused a small loss of pressure.

Roscosmos director Dmitry Rogozin said the hole could have been drilled during manufacturing or while in orbit. He did not say if he suspected that the current crew of three Americans, two Russians and a German on board the station (pictured)

Roscosmos director Dmitry Rogozin said the hole could have been drilled during manufacturing or while in orbit. He did not say if he suspected that the current crew of three Americans, two Russians and a German on board the station (pictured)

Roscosmos director Dmitry Rogozin said the hole could have been drilled during manufacturing or while in orbit. He did not say if he suspected that the current crew of three Americans, two Russians and a German on board the station (pictured)

However, as the investigation progressed, it began to look like the hole was made by someone inside and not by the outside, either on Earth or in space, the Russian space agency said.

A leading theory from an unidentified source in Energy has said that the hole was made in the ground, potentially caused by "deliberate interference," with suggestions that the responsible person may have already been identified.

Sources suggest that the question of how to fix the hole may have strained relations between Moscow and Houston.

"There were several attempts at drilling," Rogozin said on Monday in televised comments.

A leading theory from an unidentified source in Energy has said that the hole was made in the ground, potentially caused by "deliberate interference," with suggestions that the responsible person may have already been identified. In the photo is the Soyuz spacecraft

A leading theory from an unidentified source in Energy has said that the hole was made in the ground, potentially caused by "deliberate interference," with suggestions that the responsible person may have already been identified. In the photo is the Soyuz spacecraft

A leading theory from an unidentified source in Energy has said that the hole was made in the ground, potentially caused by "deliberate interference," with suggestions that the responsible person may have already been identified. In the photo is the Soyuz spacecraft

Russia launched checks last Tuesday after its space chief said an air leak on the International Space Station could have been caused by deliberate sabotage

Russia launched checks last Tuesday after its space chief said an air leak on the International Space Station could have been caused by deliberate sabotage

Russia launched checks last Tuesday after its space chief said an air leak on the International Space Station could have been caused by deliberate sabotage

WHAT IS THE SPACECRAFT SOYUZ OF RUSSIA?

Soyuz is a Russian spacecraft that transports astronauts and supplies to and from the International Space Station (ISS), in addition to bringing people to Earth.

It is composed of a rocket that takes a capsule into space. After launch, the capsule and rocket separate, and the rocket returns to Earth and the capsule continues.

The capsule has space for three passengers and acts as a lifeboat for the ISS, with at least one Soyuz capsule always connected to the space station.

Each capsule has three parts, called modules. The crew members spend their time in orbit in the orbital module, which is about the size of a large van.

A Russian-American crew was launched to the ISS from Kazakhstan on board a Soyuz rocket on March 21

A Russian-American crew was launched to the ISS from Kazakhstan on board a Soyuz rocket on March 21

A Russian-American crew was launched to the ISS from Kazakhstan on board a Soyuz rocket on March 21

The descent module is used by astronauts when they approach the ISS or when they return to Earth. A third module houses life support systems and instruments, including batteries, solar panels and steering motors.

Soyuz is launched from Kazakhstan, the neighbor of southern Russia, and it takes only six hours to reach the space station. The crew uses the hatch on the Soyuz to enter and exit the station. When the crew is ready to return home, they travel in the Soyuz capsule back to Earth.

To land, Soyuz falls through the Earth's atmosphere and deploys parachutes that slow down its descent. When Soyuz approaches the ground, it fires small rocket motors to further reduce its momentum.

He added that the drill seemed to have been held up by a "shaky hand."

"What is this: a production defect or some premeditated actions? & # 39; I ask.

& # 39; We are checking the Earth version. But there is another version that we do not rule out: deliberate interference in space. "

An unidentified source of Energy told the Russian news agency RIA Novosti that & # 39;