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Antonio DiGrigorio was sent home from childcare in December. Two months later he was in intensive care after contacting the respiratory syncial virus, which can kill babies & # 39; s

A mother of four warns others against kissing their newborns during the flu season after her own son barely survived a serious respiratory infection last winter.

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Ariana DiGrigorio & # 39; s son Antonio got flu in December last year when he was a baby.

But for two months he couldn't seem to shake the symptoms. Soon they were back at the hospital near their home in Keansburg, New Jersey, where Antonio was diagnosed with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

In August, Ariana shared a heartbreaking photo of the son in the hospital with all kinds of supporting and controlling tubes and wires coming from his small body Facebook, which encourage parents to keep their babies & # 39; s away from the pillows of family members, for the well-being of the children.

Antonio DiGrigorio was sent home from childcare in December. Two months later he was in intensive care after contacting the respiratory syncial virus, which can kill babies & # 39; s

Antonio DiGrigorio was sent home from childcare in December. Two months later he was in intensive care after contacting the respiratory syncial virus, which can kill babies & # 39; s

RSV is a common viral infection, but not a serious one for most of us.

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But the elderly, people with a compromised immune system and especially babies are vulnerable to the virus.

Most cases of pneumonia and bronchitis in infants are caused by RSV.

It was almost fatal for Antonio.

He had been in a day care center, but the facility staff called Ariana and told her that her baby seemed unwell.

She took him straight to the hospital to make sure he had nothing to do with life.

Antonio (center) is now one and has recovered, but his mother, Ariana (second from left), begs adults not to kiss babies and possibly expose them to a virus that kills the babies. can land in the hospital or even kill. Depicted with family members

Antonio (center) is now one and has recovered, but his mother, Ariana (second from left), begs adults not to kiss babies and possibly expose them to a virus that kills the babies. can land in the hospital or even kill. Depicted with family members

Antonio (center) is now one and has recovered, but his mother, Ariana (second from left), begs adults not to kiss babies and possibly expose them to a virus that kills the babies. can land in the hospital or even kill. Depicted with family members

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Antonio was diagnosed with the flu, but his RSV test was negative.

But flu symptoms rarely last longer than three weeks, even in infants.

Two months later Antonio was no better, so Ariana and her son went back to the hospital.

This time the RSV test was positive and Antonio ended up in the intensive care unit, connected to a respirator for a large part of his stay.

Even when he could breathe independently, Antonio had to get breathing treatments.

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Antonio continued, but it was a terrifying time for the DiGrigorio family.

Ariana told me ABC she believes that as soon as her son had the flu, his immune system was weakened, and from there he could go wherever RSV had picked up.

He spent six days at the ICU at the DiGrigorios house in Keansburg, New Jersey. Even after he could be removed from the ventilator, the child needed regular breathing treatments

He spent six days at the ICU at the DiGrigorios house in Keansburg, New Jersey. Even after he could be removed from the ventilator, the child needed regular breathing treatments

RSV is not serious for most adults, but can be life threatening for infants, who can get a simple kiss on the forehead

RSV is not serious for most adults, but can be life threatening for infants, who can get a simple kiss on the forehead

He spent six days at the ICU at the DiGrigorios house in Keansburg, New Jersey. Even after he could be removed from the ventilator, the child needed regular breathing treatments (left). RSV is not serious for most adults, but can be life threatening for infants, who can get a simple kiss on the forehead (right)

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The virus travels in small droplets of spit, snot and mucus.

Even a simple kiss on the forehead can be enough to make a baby like Antonio sick, a fact that Ariana reminded thousands of people on Facebook last month.

& # 39; Do not be the reason why a baby is in hospital (or dead) because the baby & # 39; it was just so cute that I had to kiss her! & # 39 ;, Ariana wrote in a Facebook post on August 23 that was shared more than 2500 times.

& # 39; As a parent, it is uncomfortable to tell someone (especially a family member or friend) to step away from your baby.

& # 39; It is also super hard to prevent someone from kissing your child after they are already in the kiss. & # 39;

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She noted that even if an adult does not feel sick, they are contagious for 24 hours before their symptoms appear.

RSV infections are most common in adults between December and March, and Ariana implores that anyone who is sick or even thinks they have a & # 39; sinus infection & # 39; can stay at home.

And especially: & # 39; Keep your mouth / breath away from the face, hands and feet of a baby & # 39 ;, Adriana asks.

& # 39; Don't be selfish. Don't kiss babies & # 39; s. It is not worth it. & # 39;

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