& # 039; Critical point & # 039; for the farmers of South Australia that fight against the drought

<pre><pre>& # 039; Critical point & # 039; for the farmers of South Australia that fight against the drought

On Paul Bammonn's Eyre Peninsula farm, dry conditions are taking a toll.

It is a particularly windy day in South Australia, and you are seeing large clouds of brown earth in the distance.

"To lose their vegetable land, that's where all their fertility comes from, that's gone forever," he tells SBS News.

The wheat producer is not alone in having a difficult season.

Paul Bammonn is a farmer from South Australia who makes it difficult this season.

SBS News

Dion Woolford runs sheep and grows grain near Kimba, in the northern peninsula of Eyre.

"We are at a critical moment of the season," he says. "It needs to continue raining if we are going to harvest something of importance".

Tim Whetstone, Minister of Primary Industries of South Australia, says that between 10 and 15 percent of the state is now in drought.

"It's dry and it's very irregular," he says.

Map

SBS News

Some farmers are doing better than others, and high grain prices generate great returns for those who can produce it. Part of the state crop will also head east, where it is demanded by other farmers affected by the drought.

Jared Sampson, in Warramboo, west of Kimba, says he feels lucky in comparison to some.

"Grain prices are quite significant at this time … so, although it is not an excellent crop, we will have a harvest … But it depends a lot on some final rains," he says.

The government of South Australia has established a working group to monitor dry conditions throughout the state.

Whetstone says the next six weeks will be critical for farmers:

"We are looking now, the temperatures of the soil begin to warm up, which will promote growth, but we do need rain."