& # 039; Better and brighter & # 039; ONLY: the government takes energetic action against migrants with little training and unemployment bludgers

Poorly trained immigrants will struggle to receive immigration visas amid the government's plan to crack down on bludgers.

Only the "best and brightest": the government takes energetic measures against migrants with little training and the blondations of parodies in the middle of a plan to obtain more visas

  • Poorly trained migrants will have difficulty receiving visas, as they are likely to be eliminated further
  • The government just wants to welcome the "best and brightest" in the country
  • The Minister of Immigration is also pushing for immigrants to work in regional areas

Zoe Zaczek for Daily Mail Australia

Poorly trained immigrants will have difficulty receiving immigration visas in the middle of the government's plan to crack down on Dole's doilies.

Only the "best and brightest" immigrants will be received in Australia, according to the Saturday Telegraph.

Through the 99 types of visas, those that attract welfare dependent immigrants could face the line of fire.

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Poorly trained immigrants will struggle to receive immigration visas amid the government's plan to crack down on bludgers.

Poorly trained immigrants will struggle to receive immigration visas amid the government's plan to crack down on bludgers.

The government has already taken measures to eliminate immigrants with little training by eliminating the 457 visa in April 2017.

The decision almost halved the number of foreign workers and raised the average salary.

Foreign workers were paid an average of $ 110,000 in the past fiscal year, an increase of $ 15,000, while almost half of the number of skill visas were approved.

Nearly 70,000 skill visas were approved at the height of the 457 visa program.

Less than 35,000 were approved in the last fiscal year.

Immigration Minister David Coleman is also expected to encourage migrants to move to regional areas as part of the government's plans to reduce population pressures in major cities.

Immigration Minister David Coleman (pictured) is also expected to encourage migrants to move to regional areas as part of the government's plans to reduce population pressures in major cities

Immigration Minister David Coleman (pictured) is also expected to encourage migrants to move to regional areas as part of the government's plans to reduce population pressures in major cities

Immigration Minister David Coleman (pictured) is also expected to encourage migrants to move to regional areas as part of the government's plans to reduce population pressures in major cities

"We have to look closely at ways to attract the best and brightest and fill job gaps in regional areas," Coleman told The Saturday Telegraph.

"We know that Australia's immigration needs are not the same in all areas, and policies should take this into account."

& # 39; Where the system can be improved to better adapt the immigration patterns to the needs in specific places or jobs, we should do it & # 39;

Only 7,000 foreigners who moved to Australia last year settled outside the capital cities, compared with 112,000 skilled immigrants who moved to Sydney or Melbourne.

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